FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Associates Program FAQ
What is included in the Associates Program?
How did B&C get started?
What is the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation?
Do I have access to the Club's on-line Trophy Search if I join as a B&C Associate?

Records Program FAQ
What is the difference between the All-time book and the Awards book?
Does Boone and Crockett Club accept trophies taken with a bow?
How can I locate Boone and Crockett Club Official Measurers in my area?
Are the tip to tip and greatest spread measurements added into the final score?
What is the drying time for antlers and skulls before they can be officially measured?
What is the deadline for entering a trophy into the book? When can I purchase the book?
What is the difference between the Awards and the All-Time Awards Programs?
How can I purchase a records book with my listing in it?
What is the difference between the All-time Score and the Awards score?
How can I access trophy data?
How and when is a trophy declared an official World's Record?
Do elk and deer always get four circumference measurements? What about eight-pointers? What about twelve-pointers?
Understanding Spread Credit

Conservation Education Program and TRM Ranch
How many acres is the Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Ranch (TRMR)?
Does the public have access to the TRM ranch?
Who owns the Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Ranch?
Did Theodore Roosevelt ever visit the ranch?
How many students & teachers participate in the Boone & Crockett Conservation Education Program each year?
Is the Rasmuson Wildlife Conservation Center open year-round?
Who was Elmer Rasmuson?
Is the education program federally funded?


Associates Program FAQ
What is included in the Associates Program?
Anyone can join the Club's Associates Program The cost is $35 a year in the US. Associates receive:

  • Fair Chase magazine published quarterly
  • A 20% discount on Boone and Crockett Club books & select merchandise
  • A wallet card and window decal
  • Access to specialized areas of our web site


How did B&C get started?

The Boone and Crockett Club was founded by Theodore Roosevelt, along with other visionaries in 1887 over the concerns that we might someday lose our hunting privileges and the wildlife populations for future generations. The Boone and Crockett Club is more than just big game records -- the Club and its members have been responsible for a long list of activities that either created or preserved the hunting opportunities we enjoy today. Here are just a few of these accomplishments:

  • The Club's Fair Chase statement was the cornerstone of the establishment of hunting seasons, bag limits, and the abolishment of market hunting practices.
  • Club members helped to create the Lacey Act prohibiting the interstate shipment of illegally taken game.
  • Club members helped to establish the federal duck stamp program.
  • The National Forest Service, the National Park Service, and National Wildlife Refuge systems exist today in large part because of the extensive efforts of the Club and its members.
  • Club members helped establish the Pittman-Robertson Act, which dedicated the monies from an excise tax on the sale of firearms and ammunition to go toward wildlife and habitat conservation.
  • The Club has also been responsible for the support and continued success of numerous conservation, pro-hunter, and pro-big game programs across North America.


What is the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation?

Natural resources, including wildlife represent the health and wealth of a country and its people. The North American Model of Wildlife Conservation is a unique system of sustainable use that accounts for the abundance and variety of wildlife, and the diversity of landscapes and cultures across North America. The Model is based upon the premise that sustainable use of the wildlife and natural resources, always with an eye toward the long-term health of the environment, will maximize the benefit for all.

The Model is anchored by seven principles, each of which the Boone and Crockett Club and its members helped to either establish, popularize, mobilize support for, and/or defend.

Click here to learn more about the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation.



Do I have access to the Club's on-line Trophy Search if I join as a B&C Associate?

The Associates Program includes a subscription to Fair Chase magazine only and does not include access to the Club's big game records data on-line. If you're interested in viewing our on-line trophy database consider signing up for Trophy Search instead.

Click here to learn more about Trophy Search.



Records Program FAQ
What is the difference between the All-time book and the Awards book?
The All-time books, such as Records of North American Big Game, 13th Edition, are published every six years and have all trophy listings that meet the All-time minimum score. The Awards books, such as Boone and Crockett Club's 27th Big Game Awards, are published every three years, and have listings of trophies accepted during one, individual, three-year Awards period. The Awards books are considered supplements to the prior editions of the All-time books.

Does Boone and Crockett Club accept trophies taken with a bow?
Yes, our Records Program includes trophies taken by bow, rifle, hand gun and other methods.

How can I locate Boone and Crockett Club Official Measurers in my area?
The fastest and easiest way to find a measurer is to use our on-line OM Search. Follow the instructions on the screen and a list of measurers will be generated for you.

Are the tip to tip and greatest spread measurements added into the final score?
No, they are not. They are supplemental data, required for entry, used by our office to confirm overall appearance of the trophy and positively identify each entry.

What is the drying time for antlers and skulls before they can be officially measured?
Official entries must air dry at room temperature sixty days from the day after the trophy was taken.

What is the deadline for entering a trophy into the book? When can I purchase the book?
Our two regular trophy records book publications, the Awards book, and the All-Time Awards book, come out on a three year and six year schedule. The next entry deadline, which is for the 28th Big Game Awards Program, is December 31, 2012.

What is the difference between the Awards and the All-Time Awards Programs?
Our two trophy records Awards Programs described above have separate minimum scores. The All-Time Program entries continue to be published in our six year book. The Awards Program listings appear in the three year Awards book publication and species specific records books.

How can I purchase a records book with my listing in it?
Purchase our species specific records books, Awards Programs books, or contact the Records Department directly with specific trophy records inquiries.

What is the difference between the All-time Score and the Awards score?
The All-time minimum score is the higher of the two minimum scores, and qualifies a trophy for the All-time book, Records of North American Big Game. Trophies that qualify for the All-time minimum are listed in each new edition of the All-time book. Trophies that qualify for the Awards minimum, but not the All-time minimum, will appear in the Awards book, published every three years, one time only. All trophy owners who have a trophy that scores at or above the Awards or All-time Awards minimum will receive a wall certificate, have their trophy listed in one issue of Fair Chase magazine and corresponding records book publications.

How can I access trophy data?
Purchase our species specific records books, Awards Programs books, or contact the Records Department directly with specific trophy records inquiries. The Club now offers an on-line trophy search subscription. Click here for complete details.

How and when is a trophy declared an official World's Record?
The final score of a potential Boone and Crockett World's Record must be verified by either an Awards Program Judges Panel or a Special Judges Panel before it is declared a new World's Record. Awards Program Judges Panels are assembled once every three years following the close of one of the Club's triennial Awards Programs. In addition to certifying new World's Records, these panels also verify the final scores of the top 5 trophies entered in each category during the preceding three years and certify them for coveted B&C medals and certificates. Special Judges Panels are convened during the interim between Awards Program Judges Panels with the sole purpose of verifying and declaring new World's Records. In either case, two teams of two judges each measure a potential World's Record. If the scores of both teams verify the original measurement, the panel will declare it a new World's Record. If a potential World's Record is not sent in for verification by one of these two panels, it will never be declared a Boone and Crockett World's Record.

Do elk and deer always get four circumference measurements? What about eight-pointers? What about twelve-pointers?
Yes, elk and deer trophies ALWAYS get four circumferences. In the case of an eight-point whitetail, the G-4 is missing. Instead of looking for the smallest location between the G-3 and the G-4, the measurement is taken at the halfway point between the G-3 and the tip of the main beam. Similarly, on a mule deer with no G-3, the H-3 circumference measurement would be taken at a point halfway between where the G-2 measurement begins and the end of the G-2. For deer and elk, no matter how many normal points it has, four circumferences per side will always be the exact number of circumference measurements.

Understanding Spread Credit
Spread Credit on antlered game seems to be the hardest measurement for the general public to understand. Most times, the number that is entered into the spread credit box on a score chart is the inside spread measurement itself. The only exception to this is any time that the inside spread is a larger number than the longest main beam measurement. In this rare case, the longest main beam measurement is put into the spread credit box instead. For example: If Inside Spread=23" and Main Beams=24" and 25", then Spread Credit is 23 (inside spread measurement). If Inside Spread=26" and Main Beams=24" and 25", then Spread Credit is 25 (longest main beam).

Conservation Education Program and TRM Ranch
How many acres is the Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Ranch (TRMR)?
6,040 acres

Does the public have access to the TRM ranch?
As with any private land people must ask for permission for access. The ranch does have a Watchable Wildlife Trail that is open to the public (no permission needed) all year with the exception of hunting season. The ranch participates in Montana Fish, Wildlife & Park's block management program which provides hunting opportunities on private lands. The public hunting program at the TRM Ranch is operated by the ranch manager.

Who owns the Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Ranch?
The Boone & Crockett Club. This is the only ranch the Club owns. The purpose of ranch is for demonstration, education and research as it relates to integrated livestock and wildlife management.

Did Theodore Roosevelt ever visit the ranch?
No, the ranch was named after him because he started the Boone and Crockett Club in 1887 with several fellow hunters and conservationists. The ranch was purchased by the Club in 1987 and named the Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Ranch in TR's honor.

How many students & teachers participate in the Boone & Crockett Conservation Education Program each year?
Approximately 2,500

Is the Rasmuson Wildlife Conservation Center open year-round?
Yes

Who was Elmer Rasmuson?
Elmer E. Rasmuson, a distinguished Alaska pioneer, banking and civic leader was a member of the Boone & Crockett Club from 1987-2000. He was a hunter and conservationist who grew up in Alaska. His legacy to conservation and to the perpetuation of the wildlife conservation heritage of the Boone & Crockett Club is embodied in the educational and research mission of the Wildlife Conservation Center.

Is the education program federally funded?
No, the program is supported by the Boone and Crockett Club and Foundation and by grants submitted to private foundations who support K-12 education. We do also apply for state grants with agencies like Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks, Natural Resource Conservation Service, and Montana Association of Conservation Districts.

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