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U.S. Fish and Wildlife to distribute funds for wildlife conservation
Thursday, April 30, 2015

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced today that it will distribute $1.1 billion in revenues generated by the hunting and angling industry to state and territorial fish and wildlife agencies throughout the nation. Over $63 million will go to California and Nevada. The funds support critical fish and wildlife conservation and recreation projects that benefit all Americans.

"These funds are the cornerstone of state-based efforts that are critical to the preservation of America's wildlife and natural resources," said Service Director Dan Ashe. "But they are also the fuel for a massive financial engine that benefits outdoor recreationists, hunters, boaters and anglers, equipment manufacturers and retailers, and local and regional economies. Their value cannot be overstated in providing opportunities for the next generation of Americans to get outdoors, experience our wild places and learn the importance of conserving our natural heritage."

The Service apportions the funds to all 50 states and U.S. territories through the Pittman-Robertson Wildlife Restoration and Dingell-Johnson Sport Fish Restoration programs. Revenues come from excise taxes generated by the sale of sporting firearms, ammunition, archery equipment, fishing equipment, electric boat motors, and from taxes on the purchase of motorboat fuel.

In California, the Wildlife Restoration apportionment for 2015 totals $26.8 million. Nevada will receive $14.3 million. In addition, the 2015 Sport Fish Restoration apportionment totals approximately $17.3 in California and $5 million in Nevada.

Pittman Robertson-Dingell Johnson funds are distributed by the Service's Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration program. Since their inception, the programs have generated more than $15 billion to conserve fish and wildlife resources and support outdoor recreation opportunities for the American public. The recipient State fish and wildlife agencies have matched these funds with more than $5 billion over the years, mostly through hunting and fishing license revenues.

"The Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration program provides critical funding for conservation projects and outdoor recreation activities across this great nation," said Assistant Director Hannibal Bolton of the Service's WSFR program. "I can't stress enough that the key to the program's success is through our dedicated partnerships with State agencies, non-government organizations and many others."

"It is thanks to this significant financial investment made by America's sportsmen and women and the hunting, shooting sports, angling and boating industries that state and territorial fish and wildlife agencies can deliver science-based conservation on the ground," said Larry Voyles, Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies President and Arizona Game and Fish Department Director. "The Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program has made the difference between the survival and abundance of some species and it helps agencies, like mine, manage a vast estate of lands and waters and connect more people to wildlife-related recreation."

To learn more about the Service's WSFR program visit: http://wsfrprograms.fws.gov/.

This article was released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.




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