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Boone and crockett club press releases

The Club's Outreach and Publications divisions strive to keep you informed of the latest news that affects our wildlife and the traditions of hunting. Below is a list of Boone and Crockett Club press releases.

ATTN Outdoor Media Resources: For more information on Boone and Crockett Club press releases and publicity opportunities, or to be added to our press list, contact Steve Wagner, Blue Heron Communications at 800‑654‑3766 or steve@blueheroncomm.com.


Youth Entries in B&C Records Up 126 Percent - March 20, 2013
Improving Indiana Deer Herd, Habitat Produce Rare Trophy - February 28, 2013
Deadline Nearing for Entering Trophies in 28th Awards Period - December 26, 2012
Boy Scouts to Manage 'High Adventure Base' at B&C Ranch - November 26, 2012
Top 125 Trophy Counties - October 30, 2012
Club Applauds Wolf Delisting, Management in Wyoming - September 4, 2012
Boone and Crockett Members Team on Advisory Panel - August 27, 2012
Conservation, Hunting Groups to Convene in Missoula, Mont. - August 17, 2012
Senate Amendment Would Help Hunters Access Public Lands - June 7, 2012
National Trust for Historic Preservation Names North Dakota's Elkhorn Ranch Among America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places - June 6, 2012
Classic Outdoor Titles Re-launched as High-Quality eBooks - May 17, 2012
Two Studies Show Environmental Lawsuits Paid For By Programs For Seniors, Veterans, and Small Business - Government Not Accounting for Costs - May 2, 2012
New World's Record Mountain Goat - April 25, 2012
New Pennsylvania State Record Elk Confirmed - April 19, 2012
Club Lauds Passage of H.R. 4089 in the House - April 18, 2012
Ducks Unlimited Honored by B&C Club - March 21, 2012
Federal Budget Will Help Hunters Gain Access to Public - February 13, 2012
'Sporting Classics to Honor Boone and Crockett Club - February 8, 2012
Trophy Whitetails Up 400 Percent Over 30 Years - January 30, 2012
New eBook Store Offers Boone and Crockett Publications - January 22, 2012
Club Supports Renaming Refuge in Hamilton's Honor - November 16, 2011
Congress Considers Testimony on Lawsuit Reform - November 7, 2011
Club Announces 'Records of North American Big Game' - September 28, 2011
Tester Recognized for Work to Improve Hunting Access - September 2, 2011
10 Ways to Protect America's Hunting Heritage - August 22, 2011
Congress May Axe Subsidies for Activist Groups - May 25, 2011
Senate Bill Will Help Hunters Gain Access to Public Lands - May 5, 2011
Club Welcomes C.J. Buck as Regular Member - April 19, 2011
Leupold, Buck Knives to Support Club Initiatives - April 5, 2011
Club Honors Wildlife Management Institute - March 22, 2011
'Boone and Crockett Country' Captures TV Honors - March 7, 2011
Lawsuits Impact Wildlife Funding, Taxpayer Dollars - February 22, 2011
New Book Traces, Celebrates History of Elk Hunting - February 10, 2011
'Sporting Classics' to Honor Boone and Crockett Club - February 7, 2011
Club Names Skyhorse Publishing as Official Book Distributor - January 19, 2011
New President of Boone and Crockett Club: Ben B. Wallace - January 12, 2011
Club's 27th Big Game Awards Book Now Available - January 11, 2011


Youth Entries in B&C Records Up 126 Percent
March 20, 2013
MISSOULA, Mont. (March 20, 2013)--Young hunters age 16 and under have taken 152 Boone and Crockett-qualifying trophies over the past three years.

That total represents a 126 percent increase over the previous three-year period.

Each trophy will be listed in the Boone and Crockett Club 28th Big Game Awards book due out later this year, and each young hunter has been invited to display their trophy at one of North America's longest-running celebrations of big-game conservation and management--the 28th Big Game Awards event, July 17-20 in Reno, Nev.

The triennial event at the Silver Legacy Hotel in Reno features a public exhibition of new World's Records, Top 5 trophies and records-book specimens taken by youths.

Go to the Big Game Awards website for more info about the event.

"Congratulations to the growing number of young hunters whose name now appears in Boone and Crockett records next to a world-class big-game trophy taken in fair chase," said Richard Hale, chairman of the Club's Records Committee. "From deer to bear to sheep, entries by youths appear to be more and more common in the B&C records book."

Hale attributed the growth in entries to more youths afield, more youths hunting selectively, and big-game herds that are increasingly abundant, healthy and well managed in many areas of North America.

Between 2007-2009, young hunters claimed 67 of the total 4,907 entries in Boone and Crockett records, which equaled 1.3 percent.

In the 2010-2012 period, youths claimed 152 of the total 4,825 entries, or 3.2 percent.

Boone and Crockett Club began keeping trophy records in 1906 as a way of detailing species once headed for extinction. Today, trophy data reflect population balance and habitat quality. Biologists compare and contrast records to improve local management strategies as well as state and federal wildlife polices.

"Our club began hosting public exhibitions of big-game trophies in 1947," added Hale, "so that people can see the trophies we honor as symbols of successful conservation. America's conservation system is led and funded primarily by hunters, but it benefits all wildlife as well as all citizens who appreciate wildlife and wild places."

For the upcoming exhibition in Reno, Boone and Crockett invited 191 hunters with top entries between 2010-2012, plus the 152 youths, for a total of 343--a new record.

Leica Sport Optics is sponsoring the youth portion of the 28th Awards ceremonies, titled Generation Next.

To date, the growing list of sponsors for the Boone and Crockett Club 28th Big Game Awards, July 17-20, includes Leica Sport Optics, Aimpoint, ATK-Federal Premium Ammunition, Buck Knives, Boyt Harness Co., Hornady, Realtree, Schnee's, Hunting GPS Maps, Deadeye Outfitters and Leupold.


About the Boone and Crockett Club
Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, the Boone and Crockett Club promotes guardianship and visionary management of big game and associated wildlife in North America. The Club maintains the highest standards of fair-chase sportsmanship and habitat stewardship. Member accomplishments include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostering the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the cornerstones of modern game laws. The Boone and Crockett Club is headquartered in Missoula, Mont. For details, visit www.boone-crockett.org.

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Improving Indiana Deer Herd, Habitat Produce Rare Trophy
February 28, 2013
MISSOULA, Mont. (Feb. 28, 2013)-An Indiana sportsman has recorded the second-largest whitetail deer ever taken by a hunter, according to Boone and Crockett, which
compiles such records for conservation, management and historical purposes.

The buck's antlers are the largest non-typical antlers recorded in more than a decade and only the fifth ever to break the 300-inch mark, with a final score of 305-7/8.

The hunter, Tim Beck, bagged the buck on Nov. 17, 2012, in Huntington County, Ind.

Following the required drying period and due diligence by the Club's records department, Boone and Crockett officially entered the buck into its records, which date back to 1830.

The buck now stands as the fourth largest non-typical whitetail on record. The current World's Record for non-typical whitetails (333-7/8 inches from Missouri) as well as the No. 2 buck (328-2/8 inches from Ohio) were not hunter-taken trophies. Both were found dead and entered into the records as "pickups." The third-largest buck in the category was
taken by a hunter in Iowa and scores 307-5/8.

Indiana deer were extirpated by the 1930s. Restoration efforts, led and funded by hunters, began by relocating deer from source herds in Wisconsin, Michigan, Pennsylvania and North Carolina. Protective law enforcement, habitat enhancement and other measures followed. Thanks to early and ongoing conservation and management practices, deer populations grew until the 1980s, when overall population carrying capacity numbers were reached, then stabilized largely through expanded doe harvest.

Today, Indiana now not only has one of the country's best-managed deer herds, it is also an up-and-coming state for trophy production. The Beck buck is also the new Indiana state record non-typical, surpassing a buck taken in 1980 that scores 251-4/8.

Prior to 1970, Boone and Crockett-class trophies were virtually unheard-of in Indiana. By 1990, eight trophies per year were being entered into the Club's records. By 2000, trophy entries had grown to 23 per year. By 2010, the number had swelled to 41 per year.

About the Boone and Crockett Club
Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, the Boone and Crockett Club promotes guardianship and visionary management of big game and associated wildlife in North America. The Club maintains the highest standards of fair-chase sportsmanship and habitat stewardship. Member accomplishments include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostering the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the cornerstones of modern game laws. The Boone and Crockett Club is headquartered in Missoula, Mont. For details, visit www.boone-crockett.org.
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Deadline Nearing for Entering Trophies in 28th Awards Period
December 26, 2012
By Boone and Crockett Club
--
MISSOULA, Mont. (Dec. 7, 2012)--Attention big-game hunters: Dec. 31, 2012, is the deadline for entering your trophies into Boone and Crockett records, if you'd like to be included in the Club's 28th triennial Big Game Awards book, banquet, exhibit and conservation data.

The Boone and Crockett scoring and records-keeping program was the first-ever data collection system designed to measure and evaluate the population health and habitat quality of native North American big-game species. This historic info has been used for decades to improve state and federal wildlife polices and management strategies.

Trophy entry materials (official score chart, entry form and affidavit, and photos) postmarked by Dec. 31 will be processed for the next Boone and Crockett records book. The triennial publication will list trophies accepted in 2010, 2011 and 2012, and is slated for release in October 2013.

Of all the trophies entered during those three years, the Top 5 specimens in each of 36 categories of native North American big game will be invited to a special awards banquet, exhibit and other events July 17-20, 2013, in Reno, Nev. The Boone and Crockett Club 28th Big Game Awards Program will be held at the Silver Legacy Resort and Casino, where an exhibit of these high-ranking trophies will be open for public display.

To find an official measurer in your area, visit www.boone-crockett.org.

For more information on the Boone and Crockett 28th Big Game Awards event, visit www.biggameawards.com.

"Big game trophies are proof that hunter-supported conservation programs work and that the user pay/public benefit model of wildlife management is the only proven way to sustain healthy and balanced wildlife populations for the future," said Eldon Buckner, chairman of the Club's Records of North American Big Game Committee.


About the Boone and Crockett Club
Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, the Boone and Crockett Club promotes guardianship and visionary management of big game and associated wildlife in North America. The Club maintains the highest standards of fair-chase sportsmanship and habitat stewardship. Member accomplishments include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostering the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the cornerstones of modern game laws. The Boone and Crockett Club is headquartered in Missoula, Mont. For details, visit www.boone-crockett.org.

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Boy Scouts to Manage 'High Adventure Base' at B&C Ranch
November 26, 2012
By Boone and Crockett Club
A new partnership between the Boy Scouts and the Boone and Crockett Club could make Montana a premier destination for scouts from across the nation.

The Montana Council of Boy Scouts of America is assuming operation of a "high adventure base" at the Club's 6,300-acre Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Ranch near Choteau, Mont. The ranch adjoins the Bob Marshall Wilderness Area and serves as the center of summertime scouting activities such as trekking, backpacking, mountain climbing, shooting, wildlife watching and more.

Previously, Boone and Crockett managed the program in conjunction with the council.

The most noticeable difference in the new management is the council's goal of better incorporating the ranch into a larger plan to draw even more scouts to "The Last Best Place."

"The Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Ranch is one of only two nationally certified high adventure bases in the entire Northwest (the other is in Colorado). We want to make Montana one of the premier destinations for scout troops from all over the country," said Chuck Eubank, Montana Council president.

The Montana Council also operates smaller bases near Big Fork and Lewistown, Mont., as well as on Melita Island on Flathead Lake.

"This combination of sites and potential for different kinds of adventures makes Montana a very appealing scouting destination that is truly national in scope," added Eubank.

Another important difference in the new management of the high adventure base is a more streamlined process to get Boy Scouts on site.

Gordon Rubard, executive director of the Montana Council said, "There aren't too many councils anywhere in the country operating their own high adventure base and associated programs, especially at a place where you can hike right off a private ranch and into one of the most rugged wildernesses anywhere. It's a beautiful, special, interesting place."

For more information on the Montana High Adventure Base, go to the Montana Council's webpage at www.montanabsa.org.

Apart from scouting activities, Boone and Crockett will continue to offer its own Outdoor Adventure Camps at the ranch. The conservation-themed camps are open to youths nationwide.

The Club also hosts many other kinds of educational events at the ranch's Rasmuson Wildlife Conservation Center, which contains a classroom, great room/dining hall and sleeping quarters.

"Even in tough economic times, we cannot lose sight of the importance of connecting our young people to the great outdoors," said Boone and Crockett President Ben Wallace. "All of these youth programs centered on the ranch and expanding onto adjoining public lands are providing more youth with positive, life-changing, outdoor experiences."

The Boone and Crockett Club shares an interesting line of history with the Boy Scouts of America. Theodore Roosevelt founded the Club in 1887, prior to his presidency. He was out of office in 1910 when the Boy Scouts was launched, but Roosevelt became an instant and staunch advocate for the cause. In fact, he became a committeeman of Troop 39 of Oyster Bay, N.Y., near his home at Sagamore Hill, and the first commissioner of the Nassau County Council. Roosevelt was later elected honorary vice president of the Boy Scouts and the only man ever to be designated as a Chief Scout Citizen.

For many years after Roosevelt's death in 1919, several thousand scouts and leaders in the New York area made annual pilgrimages to their hunter-hero's grave in Oyster Bay.

Boone and Crockett established the Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Ranch in 1987.

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Top 125 Trophy Counties
October 30, 2012
Boone and Crockett Club
MISSOULA, Mont. (Oct. 30, 2012)--In commemoration of its 125th anniversary, Boone and Crockett Club has released an historic list of the Top 125 trophy counties across the U.S.

The list is based on Boone and Crockett big-game records--trophy data going back to 1830 and long used by conservationists to gauge outstanding habitat, strong recruitment of game animals into older age classes, sustainable harvest objectives and other elements of sound wildlife management and fair-chase hunting.

"Consistent trophy production over time is proof that conservation measures are working exceptionally well, and the 125 counties on this list stand out as historic models of success," said Boone and Crockett Club President Ben Wallace. "But the good news extends well beyond the list. Trophy production appears to be trending upward with many species and across much of North America. In fact, last year our records program had 979 new entries, compared to 372 just 30 years ago."

He added, "That kind of growth is gratification for hunters, whose leadership, funding and hard work have been the driving force behind conservation since Theodore Roosevelt founded Boone and Crockett Club back in 1887."

A few counties are recognized on the list for multiple categories of trophies.

Boone and Crockett Club's Top 125 trophy counties:

1. Wyoming, Carbon County--282 pronghorn in B&C records
2. California, Mendocino County--190 typical Columbia blacktail deer in B&C records
3. California, Trinity County--185 typical Columbia blacktail deer in B&C records
4. Wyoming, Sweetwater County--183 pronghorn in B&C records
5. Wyoming, Fremont County--153 pronghorn in B&C records
6. Nevada, Clark County--142 desert sheep in B&C records
7. Wyoming, Natrona County--142 pronghorn in B&C records
8. Montana, Granite County--134 bighorn sheep in B&C records
9. South Dakota, Custer County--134 bison in B&C records
10. Montana, Sanders County--132 bighorn sheep in B&C records
11. Arizona, Coconino County--128 pronghorn in B&C records
12. New Mexico, Socorro County--117 pronghorn in B&C records
13. Nevada, Washoe County--114 pronghorn in B&C records
14. New Mexico, Rio Arriba County--113 typical mule deer in B&C records
15. Wyoming, Teton County--108 Shiras' moose in B&C records
16. Texas, Hudspeth County--106 pronghorn in B&C records
17. California, Humboldt County--100 typical Columbia blacktail deer in B&C records
18. New Mexico, Mora County--99 pronghorn in B&C records
19. Oregon, Jackson County--93 typical Columbia blacktail deer in B&C records
20. Arizona, Pima County--92 typical Coues' whitetail deer in B&C records
21. Arizona, Yavapai County--92 pronghorn in B&C records
22. Nevada, Humboldt County--89 pronghorn in B&C records
23. Wisconsin, Buffalo County--86 typical whitetail deer in B&C records
24. New Mexico, Catron County--79 pronghorn in B&C records
25. New Mexico, Colfax County--79 pronghorn in B&C records
26. Montana, Blaine County--73 bighorn sheep in B&C records
27. Oregon, Clackamas County--70 typical Columbia blacktail deer in B&C records
28. Arizona, Yuma County--67 desert sheep in B&C records
29. Colorado, Eagle County--67 typical mule deer in B&C records
30. New Mexico, Lincoln County--67 pronghorn in B&C records
31. Wyoming, Teton County--67 bison in B&C records
32. California, Siskiyou County--66 typical Columbia blacktail deer in B&C records
33. Wyoming, Sublette County--61 Shiras’ moose in B&C records
34. Montana, Fergus County--54 bighorn sheep in B&C records
35. Idaho, Idaho County--53 cougar in B&C records
36. Minnesota, St. Louis County--53 typical whitetail deer in B&C records
37. Oregon, Harney County--51 pronghorn in B&C records
38. Arizona, Coconino County--50 typical American elk in B&C records
39. Arizona, Mohave County--50 desert sheep in B&C records
40. Texas, Webb County--49 typical whitetail deer in B&C records
41. Washington, Lewis County--48 typical Columbia blacktail deer in B&C records
42. Wyoming, Lincoln County--48 typical mule deer in B&C records
43. Arizona, Gila County--47 black bear in B&C records
44. California, Humboldt County--47 Roosevelt’s elk in B&C records
45. Colorado, Mesa County--47 typical mule deer in B&C records
46. Oregon, Lake County--47 pronghorn in B&C records
47. Texas, Dimmit County--47 typical whitetail deer in B&C records
48. California, Tehama County--46 typical Columbia blacktail deer in B&C records
49. Montana, Deer Lodge County--46 bighorn sheep in B&C records
50. Montana, Missoula County--46 bighorn sheep in B&C records
51. Nevada, Nye County--46 desert sheep in B&C records
52. Texas, Maverick County--46 typical whitetail deer in B&C records
53. Colorado, Moffat County--45 pronghorn in B&C records
54. Colorado, Garfield County--44 typical mule deer in B&C records
55. Oregon, Clatsop County--43 Roosevelt’s elk in B&C records
56. Arizona, Coconino County--41 typical mule deer in B&C records
57. Arizona, Pima County--41 desert sheep in B&C records
58. Oregon, Lane County--41 typical Columbia blacktail deer in B&C records
59. Oregon, Linn County--41 typical Columbia blacktail deer in B&C records
60. Montana, Ravalli County--41 bighorn sheep in B&C records
61. Montana, Lewis & Clark County--40 bighorn sheep in B&C records
62. Texas, La Salle County--40 typical whitetail deer in B&C records
63. Utah, Weber County--40 Shiras’ moose in B&C records
64. Wyoming, Lincoln County--40 Shiras’ moose in B&C records
65. Arizona, Apache County--39 typical American elk in B&C records
66. Montana, Lincoln County--39 Shiras’ moose in B&C records
67. Colorado, Gunnison County--38 typical mule deer in B&C records
68. Montana, Rosebud County--38 pronghorn in B&C records
69. Nevada, Elko County--38 Rocky Mountain goat in B&C records
70. Wisconsin, Price County--38 black bear in B&C records
71. Idaho, Bonneville County--37 Shiras’ moose in B&C records
72. Minnesota, St. Louis County--37 non-typical whitetail deer in B&C records
73. Utah, Garfield County--36 bison in B&C records
74. Wisconsin, Trempealeau County--36 typical whitetail deer in B&C records
75. Colorado, Montrose County--35 typical mule deer in B&C records
76. Arizona, Coconino County--34 non-typical mule deer in B&C records
77. Colorado, Delta County--34 typical mule deer in B&C records
78. Colorado, Jackson County--34 Shiras’ moose in B&C records
79. Iowa, Allamakee County--34 typical whitetail deer in B&C records
80. Washington, Pierce County--34 typical Columbia blacktail deer in B&C records
81. Wisconsin, Bayfield County--34 black bear in B&C records
82. Wisconsin, Sawyer County--34 black bear in B&C records
83. Wyoming, Campbell County--34 pronghorn in B&C records
84. Colorado, Montezuma County--33 typical mule deer in B&C records
85. Wisconsin, Buffalo County--33 non-typical whitetail deer in B&C records
86. Washington, Pend Oreille County--32 Shiras’ moose in B&C records
87. North Carolina, Hyde County--32 black bear in B&C records
88. Wyoming, Albany County--32 pronghorn in B&C records
89. Arizona, Gila County--31 typical Coues’ whitetail deer in B&C records
90. Illinois, Jo Daviess County--31 typical whitetail deer in B&C records
91. Montana, Beaverhead County--31 Shiras’ moose in B&C records
92. Montana, Flathead County--31 Shiras’ moose in B&C records
93. New Mexico, Rio Arriba County--31 non-typical mule deer in B&C records
94. Oregon, Columbia County--31 Roosevelt’s elk in B&C records
95. Oregon, Marion County--31 typical Columbia blacktail deer in B&C records
96. Wyoming, Park County--31 typical American elk in B&C records
97. Iowa, Clayton County--30 typical whitetail deer in B&C records
98. Oregon, Wallowa County--30 bighorn sheep in B&C records
99. Wisconsin, Baron County--30 black bear in B&C records
100. Wyoming, Carbon County--30 typical mule deer in B&C records
101. Arizona, Maricopa County-- 29 desert sheep in B&C records
102. Colorado, Rio Blanco County--29 cougar in B&C records
103. New Mexico, Rio Arriba County--29 cougar in B&C records
104. New Mexico, Taos County--29 bighorn sheep B&C records
105. Utah, Kane County--29 typical mule deer in B&C records
106. Washington, Clallam County--29 Roosevelt’s elk in B&C records
107. Illinois, Pike County--28 non-typical whitetail deer in B&C records
108. Nevada, White Pine County--28 typical American elk in B&C records
109. Illinois, Fulton County--26 non-typical whitetail deer in B&C records
110. New Mexico, Catron County--26 typical American elk in B&C records
111. Minnesota, Itasca County--25 non-typical whitetail deer in B&C records
112. Arizona, Apache County--24 non-typical American elk in B&C records
113. Arizona, Pima County--24 non-typical Coues’ whitetail deer in B&C records
114. Illinois, Adams County--24 non-typical whitetail deer in B&C records
115. New Mexico, San Juan County--24 typical American elk in B&C records
116. California, San Bernardino County--23 desert sheep in B&C records
117. California, Solano County--23 tule elk in B&C records
118. California, Trinity County--20 bighorn sheep in B&C records
119. Iowa, Van Buren County--19 non-typical whitetail deer in B&C records
120. Wyoming, Teton County--19 typical American elk in B&C records
121. Montana, Park County--17 bison in B&C records
122. Texas, Culberson County--16 desert sheep in B&C records
123. Washington, Chelan County--15 Rocky Mountain goat in B&C records
124. Washington, Okanogan County--15 Rocky Mountain goat in B&C records
125. Idaho, Caribou County--1 grizzly bear in B&C records (1900)


Native North American big game species tracked by Boone and Crockett Club but not included in the Top 125 counties include Alaska brown and polar bear; barren ground, central Canada barren ground, Quebec-Labrador, mountain and woodland caribou; Dall's and Stone's sheep; Alaska-Yukon and Canada moose; Sitka blacktail deer and muskox. These species are recorded by geographic location rather than by county.

The Top 125 list is based on "Trophy Search," a searchable online database available to subscribers. Users can sort B&C archival data in infinite ways to identify trophy trends and locations. An annual subscription is $50. Boone and Crockett Club Associates can receive a discount. Order online at www.boone-crockett.org or by calling 888-840-4868.


About the Boone and Crockett Club
Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, the Boone and Crockett Club promotes guardianship and visionary management of big game and associated wildlife in North America. The Club maintains the highest standards of fair-chase sportsmanship and habitat stewardship. Member accomplishments include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostering the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the cornerstones of modern game laws. The Boone and Crockett Club is headquartered in Missoula, Mont. For details, visit www.boone-crockett.org.

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Club Applauds Wolf Delisting, Management in Wyoming
September 4, 2012
By Boone and Crockett Club
--
The Boone and Crockett Club applauds the Aug. 31, 2012, decision of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) for returning management authority for the gray wolf to the State of Wyoming.

This decision is consistent with the Endangered Species Act of 1973 and the 1980 and 1987 Northern Rocky Mountain Wolf Recovery Plans. This delisting of the Wyoming wolf population from the lists of threatened and endangered species completes a decades-long project to restore the wolf to the Rocky Mountains that began in 1973. A large and growing wolf population now ranges in North America from the Rockies and the Great Lakes area north through Canada and Alaska.

The challenge of managing the gray wolf now enters a new stage in Wyoming, as it joins the neighboring states of Idaho and Montana in conducting a science-based program to control the rapid growth of wolf populations and the effects of this top predator on other wildlife populations, especially big game such as deer, elk and moose. Like Montana and Idaho and the Great Lakes states, Wyoming's program includes regulated hunting and trapping of the gray wolf as a trophy game animal. Wyoming's hunting season will begin Oct. 1, 2012.

As the first national wildlife conservation group in North America, Boone and Crockett Club welcomes the inclusion, at long last, of the gray wolf among the wildlife species managed scientifically by state wildlife biologists. The Club supports the public trust management of all wildlife including wolves, cougars, bears and other predators by state, provincial, territorial or tribal management authorities. The Club further supports the informed management of all ecosystems and their components, including top predators, and that such management must balance the needs of humans and wildlife.

Gray wolf populations in the northern Rocky Mountains achieved federal recovery goals around 2002 and continued growing. Today the northern Rocky Mountain wolf population in a six-state area exceeds 1,774 wolves and 109 breeding pairs. Today in Wyoming the wolf population is more than 10 times the size of the recovery goal established in the 1987 Recovery Plan. Despite this overwhelming evidence during a 10-year period, FWS was prevented from following the law established by the Endangered Species Act and returning management authority to states by repeated lawsuits. The lawsuits exploited the required public process prescribed by the Endangered Species Act by which FWS makes delisting decisions to obscure the plain biological fact that the wolf population was growing without adequate scientific management oversight that by law can be provided only by state governments.

In 2011, Congress, in an unprecedented legislative action, was forced to intervene to reinstate a FWS delisting decision that applied to Montana and Idaho. This action left Wyoming without authority to manage wolves, and it bodes well for the wolf population there that now will have proper management control. The Boone and Crockett Club endorses the delisting decision of FWS and applauds their efforts to follow the spirit and letter of the law prescribed by the Endangered Species Act which they are mandated to enforce.
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Boone and Crockett Members Team on Advisory Panel
August 27, 2012
By Boone and Crockett Club
--
MISSOULA, Mont.--Of the 18 conservation leaders selected to advise the Obama Administration on wildlife and sporting issues, 11 are members of the Boone and Crockett Club. That influence is good news for America's hunters because it ensures strong advocacy for high standards in fair-chase sportsmanship, habitat stewardship and science-based wildlife management.

Founded by Theodore Roosevelt, the Club has long maintained the highest standards for North American hunters--and documented the conservation benefits through big-game records that date back to the late 1880s.

Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar and Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack on Aug. 17 announced appointees to the Wildlife Hunting Heritage Conservation Council.

The council will include the following Boone and Crockett Club members:

- David Allen (Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation)
- Jeffrey Crane (Congressional Sportsmen's Foundation)
- Jonathan Gassett (Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources)
- Thomas Franklin (Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership)
- Winifred Kessler (The Wildlife Society)
- Robert Model (chairman of Boone and Crockett Club)
- Joanna Prukop (former New Mexico Secretary of Energy, Minerals & Natural Resources)
- Stephen Sanetti (National Shooting Sports Foundation)
- Christine Thomas (College of Natural Resources, University of Wisconsin)
- John Tomke (Ducks Unlimited)
- Steve Williams (Wildlife Management Institute)

"It's gratifying to see so many Boone and Crockett members on the council," said Club President Ben Wallace. "Each was selected as a federal advisor for the same reasons that he or she was selected as a regular or professional member of our organization--their professionalism, education, background, leadership, vision and passion for the future of wildlife, hunting and shooting sports."

Traditional sporting pursuits continue to fuel the primary funding mechanisms for conservation and wildlife management. It's a system that must be preserved, said Wallace.

He added, "I'm confident that our President and his staff will receive the highest level of guidance from this group. Congratulations to all the appointees on their selection."

Some selectees will be serving their second term (three years) on the council, launched in 2010.

The council was formed to promote and preserve America's wildlife and hunting heritage for future generations by identifying issues and proposing solutions that advance sustainable use conservation.

Six federal agencies playing a key role in America's outdoor heritage--U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, Natural Resource Conservation Service and Farm Service Agency--and the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, will also have representation on the council.

For the full list of recent appointees and more info about the council, see the Department of Interior's press release.

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Conservation, Hunting Groups to Convene in Missoula, Mont.
August 17, 2012
By Boone and Crockett Club
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MISSOULA, Mont. (Aug. 15, 2012)--A consortium of 42 conservation and hunting organizations representing 6 million members will convene Aug. 17-18 in Missoula, Mont.--right where the consortium began 12 years ago in a summit called by Boone and Crockett Club.

The American Wildlife Conservation Partners (AWCP) has met biannually in different locations since 2000, bringing together a diverse array of organizations to focus on issues of mutual interest.

Every four years, concurrent with presidential elections, AWCP drafts a series of recommendations for the incoming administration. These recommendations represent a general agreement of partner organizations and outline steps necessary to promote the conservation and management of wildlife in America. Most importantly, these recommendations represent beneficial and ongoing conservation work that must be allowed to continue under a new administration.

"AWCP has become well recognized and effective at the highest levels of government because it represents the collective voice of 6 million citizens. It gives hunters, anglers, recreational shooters and conservationists a unified voice and political strength that no single organization can match," said Boone and Crockett President Ben Wallace. "The founding of AWCP is clearly one of the most important conservation accomplishments in the last 10-20 years."

The 2012 gathering is co-hosted by Boone and Crockett Club and the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation (RMEF). Most meetings will be held at RMEF headquarters in Missoula.

"RMEF helped found AWCP back in 2000 and we've been involved ever since," said David Allen, RMEF president and CEO. "The organizations within AWCP don't line up on the same side of every issue, but when we stand together, our collective voice is very powerful in Washington D.C."

Wallace said Boone and Crockett called the original summit, and continues to be a leader in AWCP today, because the changing structure of American society is challenging traditional models of wildlife conservation supported by hunting, fishing and shooting.

For more information about AWCP, visit www.wildlifepartners.org.

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Senate Amendment Would Help Hunters Access Public Lands
June 7, 2012
By Boone and Crockett Club
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MISSOULA, Mont.--Sen. Jon Tester (D-Mont.) and Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.) today offered a package of sportsmen's bills in an amendment to the Farm Bill legislation. One piece of the amendment guarantees funding for improving hunter access to existing public lands. This bipartisan amendment is supported by the Boone and Crockett Club, Congressional Sportsmen's Foundation and other hunting organizations.

The amendment directs the U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to acquire rights of way and other land interests from willing-seller landowners to open access to existing public lands where public access for hunting and fishing is closed. The amendment also protects ammunition from lawsuits designed to force the Environmental Protection Agency to ban lead in ammunition and fishing tackle. Also benefitting hunters, the amendment provides funds for states to create public shooting ranges. For duck hunters, the amendment reauthorizes the Duck Stamp Act and the Wetlands Conservation Act--both instrumental in preserving waterfowl habitat.

"History shows conservation happens when and where hunting and fishing are allowed--this amendment, if enacted, will provide better access to our national forests and BLM lands for hunting and fishing, and will protect many critical elements of the hunting experience. It is a homerun for hunters and we will work to get it enacted into law," said Ben Wallace, president of Boone and Crockett Club.

For the 32 million American hunters, anglers and recreational shooters, federal public lands are increasingly vital to their participation in outdoor sports. Nearly half of all hunters, for example, conduct a portion of their hunting activity on public lands. Reduced access is cited as a primary reason that hunters, anglers and target shooters stop participating in these traditional sports. A 2004 report to the U.S. House Committee On Appropriations concluded that more than 35 million acres of Forest Service and BLM lands have inadequate access. Specifically, nearly 2 million acres (10 percent) of Forest Service lands in Montana and 8.4 million acres (29 percent) of BLM lands in the Montana/Dakotas region were identified as having inadequate access.

Sportsmen and women make important contributions to both wildlife conservation and the nation's economy. The hunting and shooting sports industries create over 160,000 full-time jobs nationwide, generating an economic benefit of over $20 billion annually.


About the Boone and Crockett Club
Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, the Boone and Crockett Club promotes guardianship and visionary management of big game and associated wildlife in North America. The Club maintains the highest standards of fair-chase sportsmanship and habitat stewardship. Member accomplishments include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostering the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the cornerstones of modern game laws. The Boone and Crockett Club is headquartered in Missoula, Mont. For details, visit www.boone-crockett.org.

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National Trust for Historic Preservation Names North Dakota's Elkhorn Ranch Among America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places
June 6, 2012
By Boone and Crockett Club
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Washington, D.C. (June 6, 2012)--Today the National Trust for Historic Preservation named Theodore Roosevelt's Elkhorn Ranch in Billings County, N.D., to its 2012 list of America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places. This annual list spotlights important examples of the nation's architectural, cultural and natural heritage that are at risk of destruction or irreparable damage. More than 230 sites have been on the list over its 25-year history, and in that time, only a handful of listed sites have been lost.

A proposed road and bridge near Elkhorn Ranch would visually disrupt the landscape as well as introduce industrial traffic, noise and dust through the very place that inspired Roosevelt's views on conservation, according to Stephanie Meeks, president of the Trust. Additionally, a permit for a proposed private gravel mining operation directly across the Little Missouri River from the Elkhorn Ranch site is nearing approval from the U.S. Forest Service.

Earlier this week, the Theodore Roosevelt Association (TRA) announced its support for a proposal to designate the Elkhorn Ranch area as a national monument. Tweed Roosevelt, great grandson of Theodore Roosevelt and president of the TRA, said he welcomes the recognition by the National Trust and will work with the Trust staff to preserve the site.

"North Dakota is lucky to have one of the most famous sites in the history of conservation, Theodore Roosevelt's Elkhorn Ranch, right in its beautiful Badlands," said Tweed Roosevelt. "TR fought those who would ravage our natural resources for the benefit of the few. Now it is time to fight to save his ranch from the same type of selfish people today who would destroy it for their own personal gain."

Lowell E. Baier, a trustee of the Theodore Roosevelt Association and president emeritus of Boone and Crockett Club, said, "The Elkhorn Ranch is the very cradle of conservation in America, the sacred ground of the conservation movement, a geographic, tangible Arcadian icon of American's cultural identity, symbolizing the conservation ethic unique to our nation which Theodore Roosevelt conceived here in the 1880s. Hence it has also been referred to as the Walden Pond of the American West."

Boone and Crockett Club, a conservation organization founded by Theodore Roosevelt, and Baier were instrumental in moving Elkhorn Ranch into public ownership several years ago. But inclusion on the National Trust's new list shows that the threats are far from over for this hallowed ground.

The ranch, located along the Little Missouri River in the rugged North Dakota Badlands, inspired President Theodore Roosevelt's deep appreciation for the American West and for conservation. Roosevelt first travelled to the Dakota Badlands in the 1880s to hunt buffalo and was so taken by the area that he invested in two ranches, making the Elkhorn Ranch his home. It was here that he first witnessed the rapid degradation of America's wilderness and wildlife, and recognized the importance of conserving such national resources. The heart of the ranch is part of Theodore Roosevelt National Park.

During his presidency, Roosevelt set aside over 230 million acres of public lands in the form of National Parks, National Monuments, National Wildlife Refuges and National Forests. Roosevelt said of Elkhorn, "I never would have been President if it had not been for my experience in North Dakota."

"The Elkhorn Ranch is not only a picturesque historic site, but as a home to Theodore Roosevelt, a true 'cradle of conservation' in the United States," said Trust President Meeks. "Building a road this close to the Elkhorn Ranch would permanently destroy the nationally significant historic place. Roosevelt had an enormous influence on America's public lands system and promoted nationwide conservation of natural and cultural sites. His legacy should continue today through protection of this place."

Public comments on the proposed road and Little Missouri River crossing are being taken by the Federal Highway Administration until June 22. They can be submitted by mail to Kadrmas, Lee and Jackson, Jennifer Turnbow, Project Manager, 128 Soo Line Dr., Bismarck, ND 58501 or by email to jennifer.turnbow@kljeng.com.

Public comments on the proposed gravel mining operation are being taken by the U.S. Forest Service until June 11. A copy of the environmental assessment on the gravel operation, and the opportunity to comment, can be found at http://www.fs.fed.us/r1/dakotaprairie/.

Members of the public are invited to learn more about what they can do to support these 11 historic places and hundreds of other endangered sites at www.PreservationNation.org/places.


About the Boone and Crockett Club
Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, the Boone and Crockett Club promotes guardianship and visionary management of big game and associated wildlife in North America. The Club maintains the highest standards of fair-chase sportsmanship and habitat stewardship. Member accomplishments include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostering the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the cornerstones of modern game laws. The Boone and Crockett Club is headquartered in Missoula, Mont. For details, visit www.boone-crockett.org.

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Classic Outdoor Titles Re-launched as High-Quality eBooks
May 17, 2012
By Boone and Crockett Club
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MISSOULA, Mont.--The Boone and Crockett Club has launched a series of classic hunting and adventure books now digitally re-mastered as eBooks. Works from Theodore Roosevelt, William T. Hornaday, Charles Sheldon, Frederick C. Selous and others are being converted to high-quality versions for eReader and iPad users.

Two titles are available now in the new B&C Classics series. Five more titles are in the works with a new one to be released every 4-6 weeks.

Each book in the series was authored by a Club member in the late 1800s or early 1900s. Titles for the B&C Classics series were carefully selected by a committee of vintage hunting literature experts.

"Unlike many of the older hunting and adventure books available elsewhere for eReaders, the B&C Classics series has been meticulously converted to high-quality, true-digital publications. Many are complete with vintage photos and drawings not found in other editions," said Julie Houk, director of publications for the Club. "The digital quality, design and function of these eBooks will transport readers seamlessly back to a time when hunting trips didn't happen over a weekend, but were adventures spanning weeks or months."

Titles available now include:

"Roosevelt's African Game Trails" -- by Theodore Roosevelt. Relive Roosevelt's account of his African wanderings as an American hunter-naturalist. This edition includes over 100 refined photographs, drawings and maps from the original publication as well as bonus images not found in other editions. B&C eBook price: $9.99.

"Camp-Fires in the Canadian Rockies" -- by William T. Hornaday and John M. Phillips. Travel to British Columbia with Hornaday and Phillips as they travel by horseback on an expedition to collect museum specimens and capture their adventures with a Hawk-Eye Stereo Camera. B&C eBook price: $9.99.

Titles coming soon include:

"Wilderness of the Upper Yukon" -- by Charles Sheldon
"A Hunter's Wanderings in Africa" -- by Frederick C. Selous
"Big Game Shooting in Alaska" -- by Arthur R. Dugmore
"Ranch Life and the Hunting Trail" -- by Theodore Roosevelt
"In Brightest Africa" -- by Carl Akeley

A 20 percent discount is available for readers who purchase the entire B&C Classics series directly from Boone and Crockett Club. Visit the Club's bookstore.

The eBooks are also available from Amazon, Barnes and Noble and Apple's iBookstore.

Purchasing and downloading an e-book requires a live Internet connection and an Internet browser. A buyer is entitled to download the purchased publication and view it either on a computer or offline with an eReader compatible device such as an iPad, Nook, Kindle, Sony Reader, etc.


About the Boone and Crockett Club
Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, the Boone and Crockett Club promotes guardianship and visionary management of big game and associated wildlife in North America. The Club maintains the highest standards of fair-chase sportsmanship and habitat stewardship. Member accomplishments include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostering the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the cornerstones of modern game laws. The Boone and Crockett Club is headquartered in Missoula, Mont. For details, visit www.boone-crockett.org.

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Two Studies Show Environmental Lawsuits Paid For By Programs For Seniors, Veterans, and Small Business - Government Not Accounting for Costs
May 2, 2012
By Boone and Crockett Club
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MEDIA NOTE: For more information, contact Lowell E. Baier, President Emeritus, Boone and Crockett Club, 4909 Cordell Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20814, 301-718-1800, LEBaier@lawbaier.com; or Jennifer Ellis, Chairman, Western Legacy Alliance, 208-681-6004, westernlegacyalliance@gmail.com, www.westernlegacyalliance.org.

Two Studies Show Environmental Lawsuits Paid For By Programs For Seniors, Veterans, and Small Business - Government Not Accounting for Costs

MISSOULA, Mont. (May 2, 2012)--Studies released independently by Notre Dame Law School and the Government Accountability Office show that environmental groups pad their claims for reimbursed legal fees using a social program entitled the Equal Access to Justice Act, and the U.S. is not keeping track of expenditures.

A Notre Dame law review article shows that a 1980 law intended for seniors, veterans, and small businesses is utilized by environmental groups to get pay-backs for their lawsuits as well. A GAO study shows that no one really knows how much money has been spent, but the amounts are at least several million dollars a year.

See the Notre Dame Law School study at the link below:

http://www.boone-crockett.org/images/editor/ND_EAJA.pdf

See the GAO study at the link below:

http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-12-417R

"This study made me a strong supporter of the Equal Access to Justice Act for its intended beneficiaries," said Lowell E. Baier, the author of the law review article and President Emeritus of the Boone and Crockett Club. "This law is for seniors, veterans, and small businesses that have trouble getting their legal fees reimbursed, yet many environmental lawsuits are reimbursed without ever showing a violation of environmental law. Environmental law is clear about which lawsuits should be repaid under environmental statutes; we should stick to that clear direction and follow the intent of Congress."

"Litigation has become a routine step in environmental policy because much of it is about lobbying against decisions and forcing do-overs," said Jennifer Ellis, President of the Western Legacy Alliance. "It's not that so many environmental policies are wrong, it's that people disagree over them. Businesses protect themselves--especially against those who admit they want to destroy us--and activists try to get their way instead. Whoever files that kind of lawsuit should pay their own way."

Western Legacy Alliance and Boone and Crockett lead a coalition of over 100 groups that together both support H.R. 1996, the Government Litigation Savings Act, which will reform the 1980 Equal Access to Justice Act.

The bill improves legal fee reimbursements to seniors, veterans, and small businesses, enforces attorney fee reimbursement under environmental law, and requires full accounting of payments authorized by the Equal Access to Justice Act.

The GAO report confirms the obvious need to resume accounting, which stopped in 1995.

-- GAO asked 75 bureaus and agencies at USDA and the Department of Interior for records on payments, but only 10 of these 75 could provide data on cases and attorney fee reimbursements. Even the records provided were incomplete and unreliable, based on manual calculations from older files, and the memory of career employees. Moreover, some records may overlap, so GAO is not even certain of their totals.

-- Even these sparse records show that millions of dollars are going out the door. GAO identified $4.4 million per year of EAJA payments to environmental groups during the period of 2000-2010 from suits against the 10 units of USDA and DOI that had any records at all.

-- GAO's minimum numbers do not add up to totals available from public court records and tax returns over the same period. Public federal court records from just 13 federal courts revealed $5.2 million in legal fees per year, compared to GAO's estimate of $4.4 million, as tabulated by legal staff for the Western Legacy Alliance. A broader analysis including additional federal court records and public tax returns from just 20 environmental organizations showed $9.1 million reimbursed during FY2010 alone, as demonstrated by attorneys for the Boone and Crockett Club.

"Clearly, the more you look the more money you find," said Baier.

Ellis said, "There are two problems here: getting the money to the right people for the right reasons, and keeping track of the money."

The House-Senate request for this GAO report is the 10th Congressional directive or proposal introduced since 2010 on EAJA payments. Some of these measures address only accounting for funds HR 1996 as reported from the House Judiciary Committee is now the latest most comprehensive proposal on both use of and accounting for EAJA payments.

For more info and background from Boone and Crockett Club, visit the link below:

http://www.boone-crockett.org/news/featured_story.asp?area=news&ID=137


About the Boone and Crockett Club
Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, the Boone and Crockett Club promotes guardianship and visionary management of big game and associated wildlife in North America. The Club maintains the highest standards of fair-chase sportsmanship and habitat stewardship. Member accomplishments include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostering the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the cornerstones of modern game laws. The Boone and Crockett Club is headquartered in Missoula, Mont. For details, visit www.boone-crockett.org.

About the Western Legacy Alliance
Western Legacy Alliance strives to preserve the working landscapes and lifestyles of the American West. We do this by supporting and promoting sustainable land-use solutions and common sense conservation methods to ensure social and economic benefits for local communities and the nation. For more information or to join the WLA visit our website www.westernlegacyalliance.org or call 208-206-7309.

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New World's Record Mountain Goat
April 25, 2012
By Boone and Crockett Club
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A Rocky Mountain goat taken by a hunter in 2011 in British Columbia is the largest of its species ever recorded, according to the Boone and Crockett Club.

Club officials today confirmed the goat, a male that scored 57-4/8 Boone and Crockett points, as a new World's Record.

Since 1906, the Boone and Crockett Club's scoring system has been used to measure the success of conservation programs across North America. The system rewards antler and horn size and symmetry--classic symbols of outstanding habitat, strong recruitment of animals into older age classes, sustainable harvest objectives and other elements of sound wildlife management and fair-chase hunting.

More than a thousand Rocky Mountain goats from Alaska to Nevada have met the minimum Boone and Crockett score of 47. But by far the most entries (541) have come from British Columbia.

"British Columbia continues to set the standard for Rocky Mountain goats," said Eldon Buckner, chairman of Boone and Crockett Club's Records of North American Big Game Committee. "The province remains home to more than half of the world's population and trophy-class specimens have been trending upward each decade since the 1970s. That testifies to the professionalism of the British Columbia Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations."

The new World's Record goat surpassed the old mark by a substantial 6/8 of an inch.

The previous record was actually a tie between two British Columbia goats, one taken in 1949 and the other in 1999, scoring 56-6/8.

Troy M. Sheldon of Alexandria, Ky., bagged the new record goat on the seventh day of a hunt in the Stikine River area. Sheldon's friend Carey Renner and guide Heidi Gutfrucht of Northwest Ranching and Outfitting accompanied him on the hunt. He used a Tikka T3 .270 WSM to make a perfect 319-yard shot across a ravine.

Following a required drying period and initial scoring, a special Boone and Crockett judge's panel verified the goat's official entry score as a new World's Record.

Sheldon will be invited to include his trophy in a public exhibition held as part of Boone and Crockett's 28th Awards Program in Reno, Nev., next year.
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New Pennsylvania State Record Elk Confirmed
April 19, 2012
By Boone and Crockett Club
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The largest elk ever recorded in Pennsylvania, a bull taken by a lucky hunter in 2011, has been confirmed as the new state record. The official declaration was made today by the Boone and Crockett Club.

An official measurer determined a final score of 442-6/8 B&C non-typical points, which ranks 9th among all non-typical elk in Boone and Crockett records.

The bull has nine points on the right antler and eight on the left. The antlers tally 190-3/8 on the right and 188-1/8 on the left, with 47-7/8 inside spread and 29-7/8 in abnormal points. The antlers are unusually wide--an impressive 69 inches at their widest point.

The Boone and Crockett scoring system is based on antler size and symmetry, and accepts only trophies taken in fair chase.

Since the early 1900s, the Boone and Crockett scoring system has been used to measure the success of wildlife conservation and management programs across North America.

Elk are native to Pennsylvania but had been extirpated by the late 1870s. Hunters and game commissioners in 1912 began discussing the idea of re-introducing the species. The following year, a shipment of 50 elk arrived by train from Yellowstone National Park. Half were released in Clinton County, half in Clearfield County. It was the beginning of a long elk restoration and habitat conservation effort that by the late 1990s would begin to generate significant tourism, wildlife watching and, of course, hunting opportunities.

Today there are 10 Pennsylvania bulls recognized in Boone and Crockett records. Seven are non-typical elk with a minimum score of 385; three are typical elk with a minimum score of 360. All have been taken since 2003.

The new Pennsylvania record holder, William Zee of Doylestown, Pa., was hunting in Clearfield County, Pa.

"Congratulations to Mr. Zee, and especially to the Pennsylvania Game Commission for its work building one of America's most up-and-coming elk herds," said Eldon Buckner, chairman of the Club's Records of North American Big Game committee.

The previous Pennsylvania state record for non-typical American elk was a bull scoring 441-6/8 taken in 2006 in Clinton County by hunter John Shirk.

Since the Zee bull is a Top 10 entry, its score will be panel-verified during the Boone and Crockett Club's triennial awards program in Reno, Nev., next year.


About the Boone and Crockett Club
Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, the Boone and Crockett Club promotes guardianship and visionary management of big game and associated wildlife in North America. The Club maintains the highest standards of fair-chase sportsmanship and habitat stewardship. Member accomplishments include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostering the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the cornerstones of modern game laws. The Boone and Crockett Club is headquartered in Missoula, Mont. For details, visit www.boone-crockett.org.
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Club Lauds Passage of H.R. 4089 in the House
April 18, 2012
By Boone and Crockett Club
Boone and Crockett Club leaders are applauding the passage of unprecedented pro-sportsmen legislation in the House of Representatives on April 17. Behind a strong bi-partisan vote of 274-146, the Sportsmen's Heritage Act of 2012 (H.R. 4089) now moves on to the Senate.

"The Boone and Crockett Club was founded by Theodore Roosevelt to promote the use and enjoyment of our wildlife heritage to the fullest extent by this and future generations," said Ben B. Wallace, president of the Club. "H.R. 4089 is essential to the expansion, enhancement, promotion and advancement of hunting and recreational fishing and shooting--all which are vital to conservation today and for generations to come."

H.R. 4089 includes language that:

- Requires hunting and recreational shooting and fishing to be recognized activities on all Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management lands.

- Protects recreational shooting on National Monuments under the jurisdiction of the Bureau of Land Management.

- Amends the Marine Mammal Protection Act to allow hunters who legally harvested polar bears in Canada prior to its listing under the Endangered Species Act to purchase permits in order to transport their trophies into the U.S.

- Clarifies that the Environmental Protection Agency does not have the jurisdiction to regulate lead components found in either traditional ammunition or fishing tackle.

Boone and Crockett members and leaders are working directly with lawmakers and their staffs, supporting the vital efforts of the Congressional Sportsmen's Foundation, and sending letters of support from the Club to urge Senate passage of H.R. 4089.

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Ducks Unlimited Honored by B&C Club
March 21, 2012
By Boone and Crockett Club
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Ducks Unlimited is being honored with the Boone and Crockett Club's Theodore Roosevelt Legacy Award, which recognizes and celebrates cooperative partnerships in conservation.

DU Chief Executive Officer Dale Hall received the award and recognition during the North American Wildlife and Natural Resources Conference, March 14, in Atlanta.

Boone and Crockett created the award in 2008 to honor the collaborative spirit of America's greatest conservationist, Theodore Roosevelt. Previous recipients include the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and Wildlife Management Institute.

"This award is a way for us to highlight and encourage people and organizations working together to achieve great things," said Club President Ben Wallace. "Cooperative partnerships have proven crucial throughout the history of conservation--and they're going to be even more important in the future."

"Ducks Unlimited has always felt very closely aligned with the Boone and Crockett Club and its philosophy of cooperative conservation," said Hall. "As the founder of the modern conservation movement, Theodore Roosevelt realized things get done when you work together to achieve a common goal. DU is very pleased and honored to receive this prestigious award from our friends and partners at the Boone and Crockett Club."

In 1934, President Franklin D. Roosevelt appointed two B&C members, Jay "Ding" Darling and Aldo Leopold, to a committee with Thomas Beck to assess the dismal state of migratory birds and to recommend actions. Together they proposed the Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp Act, which soon became law. The act provided that funds from sales of federal duck stamps would be used to acquire land for the National Wildlife Refuge System, established earlier by B&C founder Theodore Roosevelt.

In 1935, the eventual founders of DU, through an entity they created in 1930 called More Game Birds in America Foundation, sponsored the International Wild Duck Census, the first comprehensive aerial survey of North America's most important waterfowl breeding grounds. This survey confirmed the importance of duck habitat conservation in Canada. However, federal duck stamp monies couldn't be used outside of U.S. borders.

So, in 1937, DU was launched for the purpose of raising funds in the U.S. to secure lands in Canada. A second entity, DU Canada, was established to actually deliver that mission.

Today, DU is the world's largest and most effective non-governmental organization for waterfowl and wetlands conservation. Supported by legions of dedicated partners and volunteers, DU has raised over $3.3 billion to conserve more than 12.4 million acres.

DU is celebrating its 75th Anniversary in 2012.

Hall added, "Though we have had many accomplishments in the past 75 years, DU's work will continue."

About the Boone and Crockett Club
Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, the Boone and Crockett Club promotes guardianship and visionary management of big game and associated wildlife in North America. The Club maintains the highest standards of fair-chase sportsmanship and habitat stewardship. Member accomplishments include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostering the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the cornerstones of modern game laws. The Boone and Crockett Club is headquartered in Missoula, Mont. For details, visit www.boone-crockett.org.

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Federal Budget Will Help Hunters Gain Access to Public
February 13, 2012
By Boone and Crockett Club
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MISSOULA, Mont. (Feb. 13, 2012)--USDA's and the Department of the Interior's Fiscal Year 2013 budgets include a total of $7.5 million of funding for improving hunter access to existing public lands. This new funding is the one of the top priorities for the Boone and Crockett Club and other hunting organizations. The $7.5 million, once it is appropriated, allows the U.S. Forest Service and BLM to acquire rights of way and other land interests from willing-seller landowners to open access to existing federal lands for hunting and fishing where it is closed or significantly restricted.

"Sportsmen and women want the Forest Service and BLM to provide better access to our national forests and BLM lands for hunting and fishing. This new federal budget tackles this problem head on with this bill," said Ben Wallace, President of the Boone and Crockett Club.

Additionally, Wallace praised Interior Secretary Ken Salazar and USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack for "their deep commitment to enhancing hunting opportunities on our public lands."

For the 32 million American hunters, anglers and recreational shooters, federal public lands are an increasingly vital to their participation in outdoor sports. Nearly half of all hunters, for example, conduct a portion of their hunting activity on public lands. Reduced access is cited as a primary reason that hunters, anglers and target shooters stop participating in these traditional sports. A 2004 report to the U.S. House Committee On Appropriations concluded that more than 35 million acres of U.S. Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Forest Service land have inadequate access. Specifically, nearly 2 million acres (or 10 percent) of USFS lands in Montana and 8.4 million acres (or 29 percent) of BLM lands in the Montana/Dakota's region were identified as having inadequate access.

Sportsmen and women make important contributions to both wildlife conservation and the nation's economy. The hunting and shooting sports industries create over 160,000 full-time jobs nationwide, generating an economic benefit of over $20 billion annually.


About the Boone and Crockett Club
Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, the Boone and Crockett Club promotes guardianship and visionary management of big game and associated wildlife in North America. The Club maintains the highest standards of fair-chase sportsmanship and habitat stewardship. Member accomplishments include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostering the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the cornerstones of modern game laws. The Boone and Crockett Club is headquartered in Missoula, Mont. For details, visit www.boone-crockett.org.

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'Sporting Classics to Honor Boone and Crockett Club
February 8, 2012
By Boone and Crockett Club
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MISSOULA, Mont.--In recognition of its 124-year commitment to sustainable-use conservation, the Boone and Crockett Club has received the prestigious Sporting Heritage Award of Excellence from Sporting Classics magazine.

Boone and Crockett will be featured in the March/April 2012 edition of Sporting Classics, one of America's finest hunting and fishing magazines.

Now in its 12th year, the Awards of Excellence program salutes the world's best sporting products, manufacturers, individual craftsmen and organizations that play major roles in conservation and promoting hunting and fishing. The Sporting Classics staff, along with 20 senior and contributing editors, annually selects recipients. Previous honorees include the National Rifle Association, National Shooting Sports Foundation and Dallas Safari Club.

Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, Boone and Crockett is one of the first and most influential conservation organizations. Its members founded the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostered the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, created the Federal Duck Stamp program and built the cornerstones of modern game laws.

"Boone and Crockett Club is known worldwide for helping to establish the North American model of wildlife conservation, as well as its ongoing commitment to habitat stewardship, wildlife management and big-game record keeping," said Chuck Wechsler, publisher of Sporting Classics. "In addition, the Club's ongoing work in conservation policy backed by science definitely makes them worthy of recognition through this award."

Club President Ben Wallace said, "Boone and Crockett has never been about seeking recognition for its accomplishments, preferring to work quietly behind the scenes to get done what is needed. Every once and a while, it is good to be noticed. Our members are certainly proud of this honor."

About the Boone and Crockett Club
Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, the Boone and Crockett Club promotes guardianship and visionary management of big game and associated wildlife in North America. The Club maintains the highest standards of fair-chase sportsmanship and habitat stewardship. Member accomplishments include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostering the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the cornerstones of modern game laws. The Boone and Crockett Club is headquartered in Missoula, Mont. For details, visit www.boone-crockett.org.

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Trophy Whitetails Up 400 Percent Over 30 Years
January 30, 2012
By Boone and Crockett Club
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MISSOULA, Mont.--Trophy whitetail entries from 2011 hunting seasons are beginning to pour into Boone and Crockett Club headquarters. But while the sporting world waits to see which states are hot--or not--producers of giant bucks, North America's overall robust trend in whitetail entries is a story for all conservationists to celebrate.

B&C historical records show that trophy whitetails are up 400 percent over the past 30 years.

"It's worth remembering where America's favorite big-game species stood not so long ago--at the brink of extinction," said Ben Wallace, Club president. "In 1900, less than 500,000 whitetails remained. But habitat programs, research, science-based management, regulations and enforcement, all led and funded by hunters, brought this game animal back to extraordinary levels. Today there are more than 32 million whitetails!"

The Boone and Crockett system of scoring big-game trophies originated in 1906 as a means of recording details on species thought to be disappearing. Over time, these records evolved as an effective way to track the success or failure of conservation efforts.

As North America's whitetail herd has grown, numbers of big bucks also have risen.

For the period 1980-1985, hunters entered 617 trophy whitetails into Boone and Crockett records.

For the period 2005-2010, the total jumped to 3,090, an increase of 400 percent.

During this 30-year span, many states and provinces saw percentage gains much greater than the continental average (see data below). For example, trophy whitetail entries from Wisconsin have risen 857 percent. In Illinois, the increase is 896 percent. Ontario went from a single entry to a whopping 41;a 4,000 percent gain!

Six states and provinces had zero entries in 1980-1985. For 2005-2010, they combined for 48.

Boone and Crockett offers two premier ways to trace and detail historic conservation developments, not just with whitetails but many other species as well.

A book, "Records of North American Big Game," offers detailed tabular listings for trophies in 38 different categories of game. Each entry includes the all-time entry score, date harvested, location of kill, hunter and owner names, and selected measurements. At 768 pages, the book retails for $49.95.

A searchable online database, called "Trophy Search," is another exceptional resource. By buying an annual subscription, users can sort B&C archival data in infinite ways to identify national as well as local trends. An annual subscription is $50.

Boone and Crockett Club Associates receive discounts on both items. Order online at www.boone-crockett.org or by calling 888-840-4868.

The list below includes state-by-state rankings for whitetail entries during the period 2005-2010, plus comparative data from 1980-1985.


B&C Trophy Whitetail Production, 2005-2010
(Typical and non-typical trophies combined)

1. Wisconsin, 383 entries (1980-1985 rank 3rd, 40 entries)
2. Illinois, 299 entries (1980-1985 rank 6th, 30 entries)
3. Iowa, 224 entries (1980-1985 rank 2nd, 59 entries)
4. Ohio, 215 entries (1980-1985 rank 14th, 16 entries)
5. Missouri, 214 entries (1980-1985 rank 9th (tie), 25 entries)
6. Kentucky, 199 entries (1980-1985 rank 9th (tie), 25 entries)
7. Indiana, 195 entries (1980-1985 rank 16th, 14 entries)
8. Kansas, 181 entries (1980-1985 rank 4th, 35 entries)
9. Minnesota, 172 entries (1980-1985 rank 1st, 76 entries)
10. Saskatchewan, 147 entries (1980-1985 rank 7th (tie), 27 entries)
11. Texas, 132 entries (1980-1985 rank 12th, 19 entries)
12. Alberta, 115 entries (1980-1985 rank 7th (tie), 27 entries)
13. Nebraska, 78 entries (1980-1985 rank 18th (tie), 12 entries)
14. Oklahoma, 48 entries (1980-1985 rank 22nd (tie), 7 entries)
15. Ontario, 41 entries (1980-1985 rank 42nd (tie), 1 entry)
16. Arkansas, 40 entries (1980-1985 rank 34th (tie), 3 entries)
17 (tie). Michigan, 39 entries (1980-1985 rank 17th, 13 entries)
17 (tie). Mississippi, 39 entries (1980-1985 rank 18th, 12 entries)
19. North Dakota, 31 entries (1980-1985 rank 31st (tie), 4 entries)
20. Pennsylvania, 26 entries (1980-1985 rank 45th (tie), 0 entries)
21. New York, 25 entries (1980-1985 rank 28th (tie), 5 entries)
22. South Dakota, 24 entries (1980-1985 rank 20th (tie), 8 entries)
23 (tie). Georgia, 23 entries (1980-1985 rank 5th, 31 entries)
23 (tie). Maryland, 23 entries (1980-1985 rank 28th (tie), 5 entries)
25 (tie). British Columbia, 19 entries (1980-1985 rank 24th (tie), 6 entries)
25 (tie). Maine, 19 entries (1980-1985 rank 11th, 20 entries)
27. Virginia, 17 entries (1980-1985 rank 22nd (tie), 7 entries)
28. Tennessee, 15 entries (1980-1985 rank 20th, 8 entries)
29. Colorado, 13 entries (1980-1985 rank 42nd (tie), 1 entry)
30. Idaho, 11 entries (1980-1985 rank 24th (tie), 6 entries)
31 (tie). Massachusetts, 8 entries (1980-1985 rank 45th (tie), 0 entries)
31 (tie). Quebec, 8 entries (1980-1985 rank 45th (tie), 0 entries)
33. Delaware, 7 entries (1980-1985 rank 42nd (tie), 1 entry)
34 (tie). Louisiana, 6 entries (1980-1985 rank 28th (tie), 5 entries)
34 (tie). Manitoba, 6 entries (1980-1985 rank 15th, 15 entries)
34 (tie). Washington, 6 entries (1980-1985 rank 31st (tie), 4 entries)
37 (tie). Montana, 5 entries (1980-1985 rank 13th, 17 entries)
37 (tie). Alabama, 5 entries (1980-1985 rank 34th (tie), 3 entries)
37 (tie). North Carolina, 5 entries (1980-1985 34th (tie), 3 entries)
40 (tie). Connecticut, 4 entries (1980-1985 rank 38th (tie), 2 entries)
40 (tie). New Hampshire, 4 entries (1980-1985 rank 38th (tie), 2 entries)
42 (tie). New Jersey, 3 entries (1980-1985 rank 45th (tie), 0 entries)
42 (tie). New Brunswick, 3 entries (1980-1985 rank 24th (tie), 6 entries)
42 (tie). West Virginia, 3 entries (1980-1985 rank 34th (tie), 3 entries)
45 (tie). Mexico, 2 entries (1980-1985 rank 24th (tie), 6 entries)
45 (tie). Wyoming, 2 entries (1980-1985 rank 38th (tie), 2 entries)
45 (tie). South Carolina, 2 entries (1980-1985 rank 45th (tie), 0 entries)
45 (tie). Nova Scotia, 2 entries (1980-1985 rank 31st (tie), 4 entries)
49 (tie). Oregon, 1 entry (1980-1985 rank 38th (tie), 2 entries)
49 (tie). Rhode Island, 1 entry (1980-1985 rank 45th (tie), 0 entries)


About the Boone and Crockett Club
Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, the Boone and Crockett Club promotes guardianship and visionary management of big game and associated wildlife in North America. The Club maintains the highest standards of fair-chase sportsmanship and habitat stewardship. Member accomplishments include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostering the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the cornerstones of modern game laws. The Boone and Crockett Club is headquartered in Missoula, Mont. For details, visit www.boone-crockett.org.





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New eBook Store Offers Boone and Crockett Publications
January 22, 2012
By Boone and Crockett Club
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MISSOULA, Mont.--Publishing technology has changed since Boone and Crockett Club released its first book in 1893, but the legendary conservation organization is keeping up with the times through its newly launched eBook store.

Four titles are available now. Many more, including some B&C classics, will be added soon.

Visit the Club's eBook store at http://booneandcrockettclub.directfrompublisher.com.

B&C eBooks are also available from Amazon, Barnes and Noble and Apple's iBookstore.

"Hunters and conservationists today absorb information in different ways, and we're working hard to accommodate them," said Julie Houk, director of publications for Boone and Crockett Club. "eBooks are another way that our Club can help maintain the highest standards in fair-chase sportsmanship, habitat stewardship and wildlife management."

B&C titles available now as eBooks include "Legendary Hunts" and "Legendary Hunts II," which are collections of amazing short stories. Also available now is the utilitarian "A Boone and Crockett Club Field Guide to Measuring and Judging Big Game" and the biography "Theodore Roosevelt Hunter-Conservationist." Prices range from $9.99 to $19.99.

Soon to be added eBooks include the B&C classics "American Big-Game Hunting" and "Hunting in Many Lands," as well as the new "Records of North American Big Game, 13th Edition." Also coming soon is Craig Boddington's "Fair Chase in North America."

Each title also is available as a printed publication from bookstores or directly from the Club. Order at www.boone-crockett.org or by calling 888-840-4868.

Purchasing and downloading an e-book requires a live Internet connection and an Internet browser. A buyer is entitled to download the purchased publication and view it either on a computer or offline with an E-Reader compatible device such as an iPad, Nook, Kindle, Sony Reader, etc.


About the Boone and Crockett Club
Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, the Boone and Crockett Club promotes guardianship and visionary management of big game and associated wildlife in North America. The Club maintains the highest standards of fair-chase sportsmanship and habitat stewardship. Member accomplishments include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostering the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the cornerstones of modern game laws. The Boone and Crockett Club is headquartered in Missoula, Mont. For details, visit www.boone-crockett.org.



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Club Supports Renaming Refuge in Hamilton's Honor
November 16, 2011
By Boone and Crockett Club
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MISSOULA, Mont. (Nov. 16, 2011)--The Boone and Crockett Club has announced its support for changing the name of Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge in Mississippi to the Sam D. Hamilton Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge in honor of the late director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Legislation to rename the refuge has passed the House of Representatives and Senate. The measure now awaits the signature of President Obama.

"Sam was an avid hunter and he approached conservation with a hunter's sensibilities," said Boone and Crockett Club President Ben B. Wallace. "He was part of the long, proud tradition of sportsmen leading America's conservation movement. And he served that role--both professionally and personally--with great passion."

Boone and Crockett founder Theodore Roosevelt and other early Club members were instrumental in establishing the National Wildlife Refuge System in 1903.

Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar said, "A native Mississippian, Sam Hamilton fell in love with conservation and fish and wildlife management when as a boy he learned how to band ducks and build waterfowl pens at Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge. I commend the House for recognizing Sam's distinguished career and extraordinary contributions to wildlife conservation--and especially the National Wildlife Refuge System--by voting to rename this refuge, which was so close to his heart, in his honor."

Hamilton was sworn in as the 15th director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in September 2009 and was serving in that capacity when he died suddenly of a heart attack last February.

A 30-year career employee of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Hamilton had previously served in a variety of positions, including regional director of the Southeast Region, where he was instrumental in the extensive recovery and restoration efforts required following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita and the Interior Department's restoration work in the Everglades.

Established in 1940, the Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge is located within the three Mississippi counties of Noxubee, Oktibbeha and Winston. Its 42,500 acres of bottomland and upland woodlands provide essential habitat to the endangered red-cockaded woodpecker, American alligator, bobcat, quail, white-tailed deer and wild turkeys. In addition, waterfowl including American widgeons, gadwalls, mallards and wood ducks annually winter on the refuge.


About the Boone and Crockett Club
Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, the Boone and Crockett Club promotes guardianship and visionary management of big game and associated wildlife in North America. The Club maintains the highest standards of fair-chase sportsmanship and habitat stewardship. Member accomplishments include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostering the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the cornerstones of modern game laws. The Boone and Crockett Club is headquartered in Missoula, Mont. For details, visit www.boone-crockett.org.


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Congress Considers Testimony on Lawsuit Reform
November 7, 2011
By Boone and Crockett Club
--
MISSOULA, Mont. (Nov. 7, 2011)--In testimony before a Congressional committee, Boone and Crockett Club president emeritus Lowell E. Baier told committee members that H.R. 1996, the Government Savings Litigation Act, will help America's fish, wildlife and natural resources agencies do their jobs.

The legislation will benefit conservation and sound wildlife management by bringing fairness, transparency and accountability to the Equal Access to Justice Act (EAJA).

EAJA is an historic law that allows plaintiffs to recover attorney fees and other expenses from the federal government when they prevail in lawsuits against the government. It was intended for retirees, veterans, small businesses--average citizens who need help finding and paying for a lawyer to correct errors in their earned benefits or to remedy mistaken penalties imposed by federal agencies.

In recent years, animal rights and environmental advocacy groups began using lawsuits to protest lawful decisions that they happen to oppose. The groups use EAJA to recoup their legal costs. The most frequent abuses include suing the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and other agencies on minor procedural decisions, then collecting settlements and EAJA reimbursements.

These private groups are collecting taxpayer dollars and consuming agency resources that could have gone toward wildlife management and conservation programs.

And it's a trend resulting in judges, rather than conservation professionals, shaping the future of wildlife in America.

The U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary's Subcommittee on Courts, Commercial and Administrative Law held an Oct. 11 hearing on H.R. 1996. Conservation, agriculture and livestock interests attended to urge passage.

Baier said, "We are resolute that we will not tread on EAJA's historic purpose. But we need to put 'equal' back into the Equal Access to Justice Act by requiring everyone to meet the same eligibility standards."

Currently, individuals are eligible to use EAJA if their net worth does not exceed $2 million. Businesses are eligible provided their net worth does not exceed $7 million.

"H.R. 1996 would extend these same eligibility requirements to nonprofit organizations. As EAJA stands today, special interest groups are eligible to recoup legal fees regardless of their net worth. That's an inequity that needs repair," said Baier. "To be clear, this measure will not prevent litigation. It relieves taxpayers of paying the legal bills of big-business animal rights and environmental advocacy groups."

H.R. 1996 would make EAJA consistent with the 205 other federal fee shifting statutes, all of which limit 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organizations to the same eligibility requirements that apply to private citizens and small businesses.

Baier said, "The Congressional Research Service in 2009 determined that EAJA was an anomaly in this regard. That's a glaring privilege for nonprofit groups that is the antithesis of equality and fairness."

Federal oversight and accounting of EAJA payouts are virtually absent. Total costs are unknown. One attorney tracking the issue estimates 12 animal rights and environmental advocacy groups alone filed over 3,300 lawsuits and recovered more than $37 million in EAJA funds over the past decade. Boone and Crockett research shows EAJA actual costs exceeding $50 million per year from litigation by the top 20 environmental litigants.

H.R. 1996 requires reporting exact costs.

He explained that when EAJA was enacted in 1980, it required an annual report of the number of cases processed and total attorney fees reimbursed. That reporting ended in 1995. H.R. 1996 reinstates EAJA reporting requirements, beginning with an audit of prior unreported years.

Baier added that EAJA also has hidden costs such as conservation agency personnel time spent reviewing procedures, defending complaints and often re-doing entire processes.

H.R. 1996 was introduced by Rep. Cynthia Lummis of Wyoming. Sen. John Barrasso of Wyoming introduced a companion version in the U.S. Senate. The bills together share the title Government Litigation Savings Act.

Boone and Crockett Club is joined in its support for the Government Litigation Savings Act by 37 member organizations of the American Wildlife Conservation Partners, the largest network of fish and wildlife conservation groups in the country. Together the groups represent some 8 million sportsmen and conservationists.

The coalition signed on following a 2010 Boone and Crockett Club investigation of federal statutes that enable ongoing litigation at a high cost to wildlife conservation and management. Baier, a Maryland-based attorney, led the effort. His preliminary findings are reported in two articles available free at www.boone-crockett.org. Baier also employed two full-time attorneys to research EAJA's initial Congressional intent, its judicial interpretation and application, abuses, loopholes and possible remedies.


About the Boone and Crockett Club
Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, the Boone and Crockett Club promotes guardianship and visionary management of big game and associated wildlife in North America. The Club maintains the highest standards of fair-chase sportsmanship and habitat stewardship. Member accomplishments include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostering the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the cornerstones of modern game laws. The Boone and Crockett Club is headquartered in Missoula, Mont. For details, visit www.boone-crockett.org.

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Club Announces 'Records of North American Big Game'
September 28, 2011
By Boone and Crockett Club
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MISSOULA, Mont.--The most popular and collectible book series in the Boone and Crockett Club library, "Records of North American Big Game" is now available in its 13th edition. It is the most complete records book available from the world's foremost authority on native North American big game records keeping.

Since 1932, this historic title has offered a statistical celebration of wildlife management and conservation in North America. The new edition continues that trend with more than 5,000 new entries (entered between 2004 and 2009), including new World's Records for grizzly bear, non-typical American elk, tule elk, mountain caribou and musk ox.

All together, the new 768-page book contains detailed tabular listings of nearly 28,000 trophies ranked according to their all-time scores in 38 different categories of North American big game, from whitetail to walrus.

The book includes hundreds of field and portrait photos of top-ranking trophies. A special color section features stunning photography of game species that have flourished over time with improved management and conservation practices.

Also included are chapters written by top authorities on current issues such as fair chase in the modern era of hunting, facts on lead ammunition, reforming federal laws to benefit conservation, and emerging science and management strategies for declining populations of mountain caribou.

Founded by Theodore Roosevelt, the Boone and Crockett Club maintains the highest standards in fair-chase sportsmanship, habitat stewardship and wildlife management--and has documented the impacts on conservation through big-game records that date back to the late 1880s.

"'Records of North American Big Game' is much more than a book of records. It's a history of all native big game animals in North America and an exceptional resource for all hunters and conservationists," said Julie Houk, director of publications for the Club.

"Records of North American Big Game" is hardcover with dust jacket, 8-1/2 x 11 inches, with 768 pages, 500 B&W photographs and 16 color photographs. The book retails for $49.95 (Boone and Crockett Club members receive a discount) and is available in stores or directly from the Club. Order at www.boone-crockett.org or by calling 888-840-4868.


About the Boone and Crockett Club
Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, the Boone and Crockett Club promotes guardianship and visionary management of big game and associated wildlife in North America. The Club maintains the highest standards of fair-chase sportsmanship and habitat stewardship. Member accomplishments include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostering the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the cornerstones of modern game laws. The Boone and Crockett Club is headquartered in Missoula, Mont. For details, visit www.boone-crockett.org.





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Tester Recognized for Work to Improve Hunting Access
September 2, 2011
By Boone and Crockett Club
--
MISSOULA, Mont.--The Boone and Crockett Club today recognized Montana Senator Jon Tester for his leadership in improving access for hunters nationwide.

Rarely in the Club's 123-year history has Boone and Crockett formally honored an individual outside the Club for efforts to improve America’s hunting heritage or wildlife conservation. But Club officials say Tester stands out among his peers for his persistent and remarkable work on behalf of sportsmen and women.

In a ceremony held at the national headquarters of the conservation organization founded by Theodore Roosevelt, Boone and Crockett Club president emeritus Lowell E. Baier presented Tester with a plaque and words of gratitude specifically for the senator's leadership in the Making Public Lands Public Act (S. 901).

Tester's legislation would provide funding for improving public access to existing federal lands. The secretaries of Agriculture and the Interior would be required to utilize 1.5 percent, or a minimum of $10 million annually, of their Land and Water Conservation Fund budgets to acquire public access to existing federal lands through easements, rights-of-way, or fee title acquisitions from willing sellers. If passed, the bill has the potential to open hundreds of thousands of acres of federal public land to hunting, fishing and other outdoor recreational activities each year.

Nearly half of all hunters use public lands. But a report to Congress shows more than 35 million acres of land administered by the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service have inadequate hunter access. Lack of access to hunting grounds is cited as the No. 1 reason why hunters drop out and cease contributing to conservation.

Baier said, "Roosevelt was adamant that Americans should have the opportunity to hunt, fish and enjoy the hardy life of the outdoors. Hunting is vital to conservation. Proper access is vital to hunting. Senator Tester understands this heritage and why it's even more important now than it was in Roosevelt's time."

Tester said, "America's public lands are some of the best in the world, and they're where we pass on our outdoor traditions to our kids and grandkids. But we're seeing too much of this land blocked, surrounded by private land with closed gates."

Boone and Crockett Club is among many hunting, fishing and conservation organizations strongly supporting the Making Public Lands Public Act (S. 901).

Baier added, "Senator Tester is one of the real champions in Washington D.C. for hunting and conservation and our way of life. I know the Club speaks for the entire sporting community when we say thank you for being our voice in so many important issues, from managing wolves to conserving habitat to protecting traditional ammunition-as well as improving hunting access."


About the Boone and Crockett Club
Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, the Boone and Crockett Club promotes guardianship and visionary management of big game and associated wildlife in North America. The Club maintains the highest standards of fair-chase sportsmanship and habitat stewardship. Member accomplishments include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostering the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the cornerstones of modern game laws. The Boone and Crockett Club is headquartered in Missoula, Mont. For details, visit www.boone-crockett.org.

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10 Ways to Protect America's Hunting Heritage
August 22, 2011
By Boone and Crockett Club
--
MISSOULA, Mont.--Surveys show that three of every four Americans approve of legal hunting, and support is trending upwards. As long as the majority of citizens continue to see this sporting tradition as fair, safe and meaningful, hunting will remain a privilege of citizenship--as well as a boon to conservation.

For hunters headed afield this fall, the Boone and Crockett Club offers 10 ways to help keep the public on our side.

"Modern society has high expectations of hunters," said Ben Wallace, president of the Club. "In a changing culture with ever more scrutiny of all things related to the environment, our behavior toward animals, the land, firearms and even each other is more important today than anytime in our history."

Here's how to do your part:

1. Hunting is allowed today because the vast majority of hunters through the ages have respectfully followed laws, regulations, safety rules and high ethical standards known as fair chase--the sporting pursuit and taking of native free-ranging game species in a manner that does not give the hunter improper advantage. Continue the tradition.

2. Remember: Any animal taken in fair chase is a trophy.

3. America's system of conservation and wildlife management is the most successful ever developed. It works only because of funding from hunters. Spread the word.

4. Respect the customs of the local area where you're hunting, including the beliefs and values of those who do not hunt.

5. This season, make every attempt to take a youngster hunting. If you already hunt with your son or daughter, invite one of their friends to come along.

6. Technology is a wonderful thing until it replaces the skills necessary to be a complete hunter. If it seems gratuitous, leave it at home.

7. Always ask permission before hunting private land. Respect landowners.

8. Tread lightly, especially on public land. ATVs have their place--on roads and trails. If you pack it in, pack it out.

9. Sportsmen have always been instrumental in managing big game herds. If antlerless harvest is encouraged in your area and you have the opportunity, take a doe or cow.

10. Remember: The reason for a hunt is intrinsically about the experience. A kill is a justifiable outcome but not the only definition of a successful hunt.

Theodore Roosevelt founded the Boone and Crockett Club in 1887 to help uphold sporting values and promote science-based conservation and wildlife management.

Surveys by research firm Responsive Management showed that 73 percent of Americans approved of hunting in 1995. Support had grown to 75 percent by 2003, and to 78 percent by 2006.


About the Boone and Crockett Club
Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, the Boone and Crockett Club promotes guardianship and visionary management of big game and associated wildlife in North America. The Club maintains the highest standards of fair-chase sportsmanship and habitat stewardship. Member accomplishments include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostering the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the cornerstones of modern game laws. The Boone and Crockett Club is headquartered in Missoula, Mont. For details, visit www.boone-crockett.org.

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Congress May Axe Subsidies for Activist Groups
May 25, 2011
By Boone and Crockett Club
--
MISSOULA, Mont. (May 25, 2011)-Legislation introduced today in Congress could axe what has amounted to federal subsidies for environmental extremist and animal rights groups making big business out of suing the U.S. government.

The legislation, a House Resolution (not yet numbered) and companion version in the Senate (S. 1061) titled Government Litigation Savings Act, would amend the existing Equal Access to Justice Act (EAJA). Though well intended, abuses of EAJA have escalated into a serious conservation issue with long-term consequences. Costs of defending unnecessary lawsuits against federal agencies such as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are an increasing drain on conservation funding and agency personnel today.

The Government Litigation Savings Act was prompted by a coalition (member list below) of wildlife, agriculture, energy, mining and other resource-based groups led by Boone and Crockett Club.

Club President Ben Wallace said, "We take very seriously the fact that taxpayer money and sportsmen-generated funding intended to support conservation are being wasted. We thank Senator John Barrasso (R-WY) and Representative Cynthia Lummis (R-WY) for introducing a bill that offers hope for reforming EAJA back to its original purpose--and relief for the most successful wildlife conservation system in the world."

The lawmakers held a press conference on May 25 to announce the legislation.

"When the government stopped tracking EAJA payments in 1995, it was a dream come true for radical environmental groups. Lack of oversight has fueled the fire for these groups to grind the work of land management and other federal agencies to a halt--and it does so on the taxpayer's dime. Americans have unwittingly funded these obstructionist political agendas for far too long at the expense of individuals, small businesses, energy producers, farmers and ranchers who must pay out of their own pocket to defend the federal government against relentless litigation," said Lummis. "This common sense legislation would help restore integrity to EAJA and return the program to the original intent of Congress."

"For far too long, special interest groups have funded their anti-multiple use agenda with Americans' hard earned taxpayer dollars," said Barrasso. "It's absolutely absurd that Washington pays outside groups to repeatedly sue our government. It's time to halt the endless cycle of reckless lawsuits and fix this broken system. Our bill will protect taxpayer dollars and restore accountability and transparency."

The coalition formed following a Boone and Crockett Club investigation of federal statutes that enable ongoing litigation at a high cost to wildlife and the American taxpayer. Club President Emeritus Lowell E. Baier, a Maryland-based attorney, led the effort over the past year. His preliminary findings are reported in two articles available free at www.boone-crockett.org. Baier also employed two full-time attorneys to research EAJA's initial Congressional intent, its judicial interpretation and application, abuses, loopholes and possible remedies by Congress.

EAJA was written to reimburse legal costs incurred by private citizens and small business that successfully sue federal agencies for non-compliance with federal law and regulation. Recipients were to include private citizens whose net worth was less than $2 million, and for-profit organizations with net worth of less than $7 million. Non-profit 501(c)(3) organizations were totally exempt from these limits. However, America's two largest animal rights groups, with 2009 combined net assets exceeding $209.6 million and cash balances exceeding $44.5 million, now enjoy significant subsidies through EAJA by taking advantage of their exemption loophole.

For example: In 2008, an animal rights group won a legal ruling regarding wolves and petitioned a federal court in Missoula, Mont., for $388,370 in attorney fees. The judge awarded $263,099, which was based on an hourly rate of $300--even though the EAJA limit is $125 per hour.

In 2007, the same plaintiff was awarded $280,000 following a similar case in the Great Lakes area.

The defendant in both cases was the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, whose budget--regardless of whether it's spent on wildlife or lawyers--is financed by a combination of sportsmen fees and tax dollars.

Taxpayers bear all EAJA reimbursements to plaintiffs.

Indirect costs are considerable, too. Nearly all resource management proposals are now subject to ever-higher hidden fees as federal agencies spend more and more time and resources on elaborate environmental impact statements and other attempts to "suit proof" their decision-making processes. In some cases, where the intent of the lawsuit is to stop a proposed federal action, the delays and costs to a federal agency can derail time sensitive projects even if the eventual court ruling goes against the plaintiffs.

Coalition members (to date) endorsing the Government Litigation Savings Act:

American Farm Bureau Federation
American Sheep Industry
Archery Trade Association
Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies
Bighorn Mountain Coalition
Boone and Crockett Club
Bowhunting Preservation Alliance
Campfire Club of America
Catch-a-Dream Foundation
Coalition of Arizona/New Mexico Counties
Congressional Sportsmen's Foundation
Dairy Producers of New Mexico
Dallas Safari Club
Delta Waterfowl Foundation
Family Farm Alliance
Hawaii Cattlemen's Association
Houston Safari Club
Idaho Farm Bureau
Idaho State ATV Association
Intermountain Forest Association
Masters of Foxhounds Association of America
Montana Logging Association
Montana Wood Products Association
Mule Deer Foundation
National Association of Conservation Districts
National Association of Forest Service Retirees
National Cattlemen's Beef Association
National Farmers Union
National Rifle Association
National Shooting Sports Foundation
National Trappers Association
National Union of Land and Water Rights
New Mexico Cattlegrowers Association
New Mexico Federal Lands Council
New Mexico Wool Growers Inc.
North American Bear Foundation
North American Grouse Partnership
Oregon Cattlemen's Association
Orion-the-Hunters' Institute
Pheasants Forever/Quail Forever
Pope and Young Club
Public Lands Council
Quality Deer Management Association
Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation
Ruffed Grouse Society
Safari Club International
Sixtieth Legislature of the State of Wyoming
South Dakota Department of Agriculture
Stewards of the Sequoia
Sustainable Forest Action Coalition
Texas Wildlife Association
The Society of American Foresters
Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership
Tread Lightly!
U.S. Sportsmen's Alliance
United States Cattlemen Association
Utah Cattlemen's Association
Western Business Roundtable
Western Institute for the Study of the Environment
Western Legacy Alliance
Wild Sheep Foundation
Wildlife Forever
Wildlife Management Institute
Women in Timber
Wyoming Association of Conservation Districts
Wyoming Farm Bureau


About the Boone and Crockett Club
Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, the Boone and Crockett Club promotes guardianship and visionary management of big game and associated wildlife in North America. The Club maintains the highest standards of fair-chase sportsmanship and habitat stewardship. Member accomplishments include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostering the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the cornerstones of modern game laws. The Boone and Crockett Club is headquartered in Missoula, Mont. For details, visit www.boone-crockett.org.


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Senate Bill Will Help Hunters Gain Access to Public Lands
May 5, 2011
By Boone and Crockett Club
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MISSOULA, Mont.--Sen. Jon Tester, D-Mont., and Sen. Jim Risch, R-Idaho, today introduced legislation--the "Making Public Lands Public Access Act of 2011"--that guarantees funding for improving hunter access to existing public lands. This bipartisan legislation is supported by the Boone and Crockett Club, the National Rifle Association and other hunting organizations. The bill directs the U.S. Forest Service and BLM to acquire rights of way and other land interests from willing-seller landowners to open access to existing public lands where public access for hunting and fishing is closed.

"Sportsmen and women want the Forest Service and BLM to provide better access to our national forests and BLM lands for hunting and fishing. Senator Jon Tester and Senator Jim Risch are tackling this problem head on with this bill," said Ben Wallace, president of the Boone and Crockett Club.

Additionally, Wallace praised Tester and Risch for "their deep commitment to enhancing hunting opportunities on our public lands." Tester is the co-chair of the bipartisan Congressional Sportsmen's Caucus within the U.S. Senate. Risch is the vice co-chair of the same caucus.

For the 32 million American hunters, anglers and recreational shooters, federal public lands are an increasingly vital to their participation in outdoor sports. Nearly half of all hunters, for example, conduct a portion of their hunting activity on public lands. Reduced access is cited as a primary reason that hunters, anglers and target shooters stop participating in these traditional sports. A 2004 report to the U.S. House Committee on Appropriations concluded that more than 35 million acres of U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and U.S. Forest Service (USFS) land have inadequate access. Specifically, nearly 2 million acres (or 10 percent) of USFS lands in Montana and 8.4 million acres (or 29 percent) of BLM lands in the Montana/Dakota's region were identified as having inadequate access.

Sportsmen and women make important contributions to both wildlife conservation and the nation's economy. The hunting and shooting sports industries create over 160,000 full-time jobs nationwide, generating an economic benefit of over $20 billion annually.


About the Boone and Crockett Club
Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, the Boone and Crockett Club promotes guardianship and visionary management of big game and associated wildlife in North America. The Club maintains the highest standards of fair-chase sportsmanship and habitat stewardship. Member accomplishments include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostering the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the cornerstones of modern game laws. The Boone and Crockett Club is headquartered in Missoula, Mont. For details, visit www.boone-crockett.org.



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Club Welcomes C.J. Buck as Regular Member
April 19, 2011
By Boone and Crockett Club
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MISSOULA, Mont.--A fourth-generation leader of an American family owned cutlery company, C.J. Buck of Post Falls, Idaho, is the newest regular member of the Boone and Crockett Club.

Since Theodore Roosevelt founded the Club in 1887, its regular membership (those eligible to hold office and chair committees) has been restricted to 100 people recognized for their commitment and influence in conservation issues and policies. Buck recently accepted an invitation to be a part of that group.

Buck Knives was founded in 1902. Hoyt, Al, Chuck and now C.J. Buck have built the company into one of the world's premier and most recognizable brands. C.J. started work on a production line in 1978 and is now president of a company whose products are known worldwide for quality, innovation and elegant function.

Because its products are used to prepare and enjoy the bounty of a hunt, Buck Knives also is deeply rooted in wise-use of wildlife resources and hunter-based conservation--two of Boone and Crockett Club's most fundamental tenets.

"I'm pleased to welcome C.J. among the regular members of Boone and Crockett Club. We're looking forward to utilizing his expertise in marketing and branding to help us be even more effective in our conservation goals for the future," said Ben Wallace, president of the Club.

Buck is active in the Kootenai County Police and Firemen Memorial Fund and North Idaho College Foundation. He serves on the Economic Advisory Council to the Governor for the State of Idaho, and is a co-founder and current legislative chairman for the American Knife and Tool Institute.

Buck earned a bachelor's degree in business administration and marketing at National University in San Diego, Calif. He is married and has three children, two stepchildren and a grandchild.

Q&A with C.J. Buck:

Before your introduction, what was your perception of Boone and Crockett Club?

Buck: Like many who don't know the Club's history, I assumed it was a stuffy 'brandy-and-cigar' group sitting around comparing trophies, telling hunting stories and watch-dogging the scoring of non-member trophies.

Did those perceptions change during your first Club meeting as a guest?

Buck: Yes. I learned the history of the Club and realized that many of the things I take for granted, like national parks, important conservation measures and even the first game laws, were really projects of Club members. I also did not realize just how unique in the world the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation really is.

How about when you attended the 27th Big Game Awards as a Club sponsor?

Buck: That's where I saw firsthand the work ethic and constant giving of time and money for Club endeavors. At the awards, members really rolled up their sleeves and pitched in.

As a new member, what have you learned about the Club that you didn't realize before?

Buck: As I've met and become more acquainted with Club members, I've learned they are everywhere, helping to accomplish great things by serving on the boards of other conservation groups, active on committees, advising political leaders and much more.

Why did you accept the invitation to become a regular member?

Buck: All of my previous community service has been devoted to economic development. I saw an opportunity to participate in something I'm even more passionate about--conservation, legislation, habitat restoration and wildlife management. Placing science over emotion is tough in a political environment but I want to be a part of that.

What do you see as your role in contributing to the mission of the Club?

Buck: As the newly appointed chairman of our associate committee, I realize lots of sportsmen think you need to have a trophy in the records book or deep pockets to belong to Boone and Crockett Club. We're going to change that. Anyone with a passion for big game and a desire to keep hunting can be an associate of the Club for $35 per year. And I believe the Club needs new associates as we strive to improve our ability to facilitate long-range policies for wildlife and natural resource management.


About the Boone and Crockett Club
Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, the Boone and Crockett Club promotes guardianship and visionary management of big game and associated wildlife in North America. The Club maintains the highest standards of fair-chase sportsmanship and habitat stewardship. Member accomplishments include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostering the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the cornerstones of modern game laws. The Boone and Crockett Club is headquartered in Missoula, Mont. For details, visit www.boone-crockett.org.

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Leupold, Buck Knives to Support Club Initiatives
April 5, 2011
By Boone and Crockett Club
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MISSOULA, Mont.--Leupold and Buck Knives have designated three new products to help generate funding for the conservation initiatives of the Boone and Crockett Club.

"Our partnership with these American family-owned companies is a natural extension of the values established by our founder, Theodore Roosevelt, because both Leupold and Buck Knives are companies based on the concept of wise-use of natural resources, as well as on hunter-based conservation," said Boone and Crockett Club Vice President Marc Mondavi.

The Club receives a percentage of all sales on the following products emblazoned with the Boone and Crockett logo:

Leupold Golden Ring HD Boone and Crockett Spotting Scope
This powerful new Golden Ring 20-60x80mm HD spotting scope has the distinction of being the latest Leupold product to bear the Boone and Crockett Club name.
- Leupold's Xtended Twilight Lens System
- Spotting scope weight: 61.8 oz.; length: 15-1/2"
- Leupold's proven Folded Light Path (FLP) lens and mirror system
- DiamondCoat 2, an ion-assisted lens coating
- Durable, lightweight, armored magnesium, fully waterproof body
- Made in the USA

"The Boone and Crockett Club has long promoted selective harvest of mature specimens as an important conservation and management tool. Leupold products in general, and this new spotting scope in particular, are made to support hunters in their long-range field evaluation of big game," said Mondavi.

Buck Knives 103 Skinner Knife
A Buck classic, this elegant, collectible 103 features a bull elk drawing on the blade and a real rosewood handle displaying the Boone and Crockett logo.
- Blade: 4.0" 420HC, extra wide skinner with a lasered elk image
- Length: 8 1/4" overall
- Weight: 3.9 oz.
- Handle: Rosewood with B&C logo and an aluminum guard and butt
- Case: Display box with B&C logo
- Made in the USA



Buck Knives 120 General Knife
A popular and hard-to-obtain knife, the famous 120 is now a tribute to the Boone and Crockett Club's most famous principal--Hunt Fair Chase.
- Blade: 7-3/8" 420HC, satin finish with "Hunt Fair Chase" etching
- Length: 12.0" overall
- Weight: 8.3 oz.
- Handle: Phenolic with aluminum butt/guard and a B&C logo etching
- Sheath: Genuine leather, black with B&C logo emboss
- Made in the USA

Mondavi explained, "Proper care and use of the bounty from a hunt is important to both Buck Knives and the Boone and Crockett Club. For the hunter, that commitment is aided by having the right tools to care for game in the field as well as preparation for the table."

For more information, visit www.leupold.com, www.buckknives.com or look for Boone and Crockett-licensed products wherever optics and fine cutlery are sold.


About the Boone and Crockett Club
Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, the Boone and Crockett Club promotes guardianship and visionary management of big game and associated wildlife in North America. The Club maintains the highest standards of fair-chase sportsmanship and habitat stewardship. Member accomplishments include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostering the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the cornerstones of modern game laws. The Boone and Crockett Club is headquartered in Missoula, Mont. For details, visit www.boone-crockett.org.


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Club Honors Wildlife Management Institute
March 22, 2011
By Boone and Crockett Club
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MISSOULA, Mont--The Boone and Crockett Club has presented its Theodore Roosevelt Legacy Award to an organization commemorating 100 years of conservation leadership and partnership, the venerable Wildlife Management Institute (WMI).

WMI received the award and recognition during the North American Wildlife and Natural Resources Conference, March 16, in Kansas City, Mo.

Boone and Crockett Club created the award in 2008 to honor the collaborative spirit of America's greatest conservationist, Theodore Roosevelt.

"Cooperative partnerships have always been a key to good conservation, and they're going to be even more important going forward," said Ben Wallace, president of the Club. "WMI has spent many decades developing key partners in state and federal government resource agencies, universities, businesses and organizations-- and the results have benefited every American who appreciates sound, science-based wildlife management."

WMI was established in 1911 by a coalition of conservationists, including a number of Boone and Crockett Club members, who were gravely concerned about dramatic declines in many wildlife populations. Its founders saw a need for an independent, scientific voice dedicated to restoring and ensuring wild populations and their habitats.
Although WMI's methods and locations of operation have changed since 1911, it remains a small, nonprofit, scientific and educational organization. WMI works mostly on request with federal and provincial agencies, Congress, college and university researchers and educators, other private conservation organizations and professional associations. It advises, testifies and provides educational services on timely wildlife and related issues. WMI personnel are highly educated and experienced wildlife science and management professionals who work, typically away from the limelight, to catalyze and facilitate strategies, actions, decisions and programs to benefit wildlife.
Steve Williams, WMI president, said, "This award is a major recognition of our long history, and of the many individuals who served on our staff and worked tirelessly behind the scenes to advance wildlife management and conservation. Anyone who values wildlife would be honored to be mentioned alongside Theodore Roosevelt. There isn't a more prestigious acknowledgement that WMI remains a critical, collaborative resource for conservation today--and tomorrow."


About the Boone and Crockett Club
Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, the Boone and Crockett Club promotes guardianship and visionary management of big game and associated wildlife in North America. The Club maintains the highest standards of fair-chase sportsmanship and habitat stewardship. Member accomplishments include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostering the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the cornerstones of modern game laws. The Boone and Crockett Club is headquartered in Missoula, Mont. For details, visit www.boone-crockett.org.


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'Boone and Crockett Country' Captures TV Honors
March 7, 2011
By Boone and Crockett Club
--
MISSOULA, Mont --On the air for less than a year, Boone and Crockett Country has already established itself among the best in outdoor television with two recent honor -- a Bronze Telly Award and a Golden Moose Award.

Boone and Crockett Country, presented by Leupold, debuted fall 2010 as a television documentary celebrating the best in North American big game hunting and conservation. The Boone and Crockett Club-produced series explores wildlife biology, relevant conservation and science-based game management issues, best trophy destinations, and the time-honored, ethical traditions of recreational hunting.

"We're honored to be recognized with two prestigious awards in just our first year of production," said Keith Balfourd, executive producer of Boone and Crockett Country. "Theodore Roosevelt insisted that the organization he started in 1887 be solely focused on big game conservation, and for the Boone and Crockett Club television series to be honored for delivering that message is another way to honor the Roosevelt legacy."

In February, an episode on the gray wolf and the Endangered Species Act won a Bronze Telly Award in the category TV14 Nature/Wildlife.

Founded in 1979, the Telly Awards is the premier award honoring outstanding local, regional, and cable TV commercials and programs, the finest video and film productions, and web commercials, videos and films. Winners represent the best work of the most respected advertising agencies, production companies, television stations, cable operators and corporate video departments. This year there were nearly 11,000 entries from all 50 states and numerous countries.

In January, Boone and Crockett Country was recognized with a Golden Moose Award as "Best Conservation Series" on Outdoor Channel.

The Golden Moose Awards honor top programming on Outdoor Channel. This year, 23 awards were presented, including several "Fan Favorites" determined by online voting.

Boone and Crockett Country airs several times each week, and new episodes will begin in the fall. To check local listings on Outdoor Channel, visit www.outdoorchannel.com.


About the Boone and Crockett Club
Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, the Boone and Crockett Club promotes guardianship and visionary management of big game and associated wildlife in North America. The Club maintains the highest standards of fair-chase sportsmanship and habitat stewardship. Member accomplishments include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostering the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the cornerstones of modern game laws. The Boone and Crockett Club is headquartered in Missoula, Mont. For details, visit www.boone-crockett.org.

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Lawsuits Impact Wildlife Funding, Taxpayer Dollars
February 22, 2011
By Boone and Crockett Club
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MISSOULA, Mont.-Legal defense costs are an increasing drain on conservation funding today. Alarmed by the trend, the Boone and Crockett Club has launched a new examination of federal statutes that enable ongoing litigation at a high cost to wildlife and the American taxpayer.

The Club's primary concern is the Equal Access to Justice Act (EAJA), which reimburses organizations that successfully sue federal agencies for non-compliance with federal law.

Although well intended, abuses of EAJA are escalating into a modern conservation issue with potentially severe long-term consequences.

"The Club was and is deeply involved in designing and now protecting the economic engines that drive conservation in America," said Ben Wallace, president of Boone and Crockett Club, “Since the 1880s, we've been the guardian of the most successful wildlife conservation system in the world. It's a system that depends on funding, and we take very seriously the fact that money and other resources intended to support conservation are being diverted elsewhere."

Past Club President Lowell E. Baier is leading the ongoing investigation and his preliminary findings were reported in a two-article series published in Boone and Crockett's magazine, "Fair Chase."

The articles, complete with detailed background and statistics, are now available free to the public at www.boone-crockett.org

EAJA was written to reimburse legal costs incurred by small nonprofit organizations along with for-profit organizations with net worth of less than $7 million. However, America's two largest animal rights groups have filed numerous cases under EAJA even though their 2009 combined net assets exceeded $209.6 million and cash balances exceeded $44.5 million.

Another abuse uncovered by Baier: In 2008, an animal rights group won a legal ruling regarding wolves and petitioned a federal court in Missoula, Mont., for $388,370 in attorney fees. The judge awarded $263,099, which was based on an hourly rate of $300--even though the federal limit is $125 per hour.

In 2007, the same litigant was awarded $280,000 following a similar case in the Great Lakes area.

The defendant in both cases was the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, whose budget--regardless of whether it's spent on wildlife or lawyers-- is financed by a combination of sportsmen fees and tax dollars.

Taxpayers bear all EAJA reimbursements to plaintiffs.

Indirect costs are considerable, too. Nearly all resource management proposals are now subject to ever-higher hidden fees as federal agencies spend more and more time and resources on elaborate environmental impact statements and other attempts to "suit proof" their decision-making processes. In some cases, where the intent of the lawsuit is to stop a proposed federal action, the delays and costs to a federal agency can derail time sensitive projects even if the eventual court ruling goes against the plaintiffs.

Along with wildlife, other public land- and water-based resource agencies that deal with energy, timber, agriculture, livestock and fisheries also are increasingly impacted by legal actions taken under the provisions of EAJA.

EAJA clearly encourages frequent legal challenges by some nonprofits that are, in reality, "big business." These organizations are literally making their living by suing a variety of government agencies. Does EAJA, especially its payments to successful litigants with no reciprocal penalties for losses in court, still make sense today?

Baier's preliminary study finds that EAJA needs intensive review. Appropriate modifications could help make laws that are more effective, efficient and resistant to courts deciding wildlife management policies via taxpayer subsidized lawsuits.

The Boone and Crockett Club will continue studying this problem. Government Affairs and Conservation Policy committees will examine the results and make recommendations to the board of directors for a final decision on course of action.


About the Boone and Crockett Club
Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, the Boone and Crockett Club promotes guardianship and visionary management of big game and associated wildlife in North America. The Club maintains the highest standards of fair-chase sportsmanship and habitat stewardship. Member accomplishments include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostering the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the cornerstones of modern game laws. The Boone and Crockett Club is headquartered in Missoula, Mont. For details, visit www.boone-crockett.org.

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New Book Traces, Celebrates History of Elk Hunting
February 10, 2011
By Boone and Crockett Club
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MISSOULA, Mont.-Americas premiere big-game hunting historian, Boone and Crockett Club, has announced a new book that traces the evolution of elk hunting and records keeping from the late 1880s through the 1970s. "An American Elk Retrospective" features hundreds of vintage photos, historic score charts, records correspondence and portraits of some of the most significant elk ever taken.

Readers can revisit legendary elk hunts and trophies such as:

* The famous Dark Canyon bull taken in 1899 by John Plute, which stood for decades as the World's Record
* Fred Mercer's typical American elk harvested in Montana during the 1950s that resulted in a Sagamore Hill Award from Boone and Crockett Club
* William D. DeWeese's non-typical giant taken over 120 years ago in Colorado
* Many other truly outstanding but lesser-known trophies

"'An American Elk Retrospective' is the result of hunters legendary storytelling colliding with over 100 years of records keeping and memorabilia from Boone and Crockett Club," said Julie Houk, director of publications for the Club. "This is the ultimate history book for elk hunters, conservationists and other enthusiasts with deep fascination for one of the most widely respected and prized big-game animals in North America."

The book is hardcover with dust jacket, 8 x 10 inches, with 272 pages and over 250 B&W photographs.

Chapters cover the history of elk records keeping, the hunter-led restoration of elk from near extirpation across most of their native range, award-winning elk and other special trophies, and historic figures in elk hunting, conservation and records keeping.
"An American Elk Retrospective" retails for $34.95 (Boone and Crockett members receive a discount) and is available in stores or directly from the Club. Order at www.boone-crockett.org or by calling 888-840-4868.


About the Boone and Crockett Club
Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, the Boone and Crockett Club promotes guardianship and visionary management of big game and associated wildlife in North America. The Club maintains the highest standards of fair-chase sportsmanship and habitat stewardship. Member accomplishments include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostering the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the cornerstones of modern game laws. The Boone and Crockett Club is headquartered in Missoula, Mont. For details, visit www.boone-crockett.org.




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'Sporting Classics' to Honor Boone and Crockett Club
February 7, 2011
By Boone and Crockett Club
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MISSOULA, Mont.--In recognition of its 124-year commitment to sustainable-use conservation, the Boone and Crockett Club has received the prestigious Sporting Heritage Award of Excellence from Sporting Classics magazine.

Boone and Crockett will be featured in the March/April 2012 edition of Sporting Classics, one of America's finest hunting and fishing magazines.

Now in its 12th year, the Awards of Excellence program salutes the world’s best sporting products, manufacturers, individual craftsmen and organizations that play major roles in conservation and promoting hunting and fishing. The Sporting Classics staff, along with 20 senior and contributing editors, annually selects recipients. Previous honorees include the National Rifle Association, National Shooting Sports Foundation and Dallas Safari Club.

Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, Boone and Crockett is one of the first and most influential conservation organizations. Its members founded the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostered the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, created the Federal Duck Stamp program and built the cornerstones of modern game laws.

"Boone and Crockett Club is known worldwide for helping to establish the North American model of wildlife conservation, as well as its ongoing commitment to habitat stewardship, wildlife management and big-game record keeping," said Chuck Wechsler, publisher of Sporting Classics. "In addition, the Club’s ongoing work in conservation policy backed by science definitely makes them worthy of recognition through this award."

Club President Ben Wallace said, "Boone and Crockett has never been about seeking recognition for its accomplishments, preferring to work quietly behind the scenes to get done what is needed. Every once and a while, it is good to be noticed. Our members are certainly proud of this honor."


About the Boone and Crockett Club
Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, the Boone and Crockett Club promotes guardianship and visionary management of big game and associated wildlife in North America. The Club maintains the highest standards of fair-chase sportsmanship and habitat stewardship. Member accomplishments include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostering the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the cornerstones of modern game laws. The Boone and Crockett Club is headquartered in Missoula, Mont. For details, visit www.boone-crockett.org.

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Club Names Skyhorse Publishing as Official Book Distributor
January 19, 2011
By Boone and Crockett Club
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MISSOULA, Mont--Boone and Crockett Club offered its first book in 1893 and has published over 65 titles in the decades since. Today the Club announced that Skyhorse Publishing is now the official distributor of B&C publications to bookstores, sporting good outlets, specialty shops and other retailers.

New York-based Skyhorse Publishing (www.skyhorsepublishing.com) and owner Tony Lyons have a long family history in outdoor publishing.

Lyons said, "Boone and Crockett offers a variety of top quality, award winning titles, from books about Theodore Roosevelt to the evolution of hunting in the American West to its newest records book, Boone and Crockett Club's 27th Big Game Awards. We're proud to add these publications to our product line."

Julie Houk, director of publications for the Club, said, "We publish books to help inform and further engage people in the connections between hunting, conservation, history and even everyday American life. We look forward to working with Skyhorse Publishing to help us meet this goal."

Boone and Crockett Club will continue to handle direct-to-customer sales online at www.boone-crockett.org and by phone at 888-840-4868.


About the Boone and Crockett Club
Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, the Boone and Crockett Club promotes guardianship and visionary management of big game and associated wildlife in North America. The Club maintains the highest standards of fair-chase sportsmanship and habitat stewardship. Member accomplishments include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostering the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the cornerstones of modern game laws. The Boone and Crockett Club is headquartered in Missoula, Mont. For details, visit www.boone-crockett.org.




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New President of Boone and Crockett Club: Ben B. Wallace
January 12, 2011
By Boone and Crockett Club
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MISSOULA, Mont--A hunter, attorney, banker and businessman from Corpus Christi, Texas, Ben B. Wallace has been elected to serve as president of America's oldest conservation organization, the Boone and Crockett Club.

Theodore Roosevelt founded Boone and Crockett Club in 1887. Its mission includes promoting conservation and management of wildlife and their habitats, upholding the highest standards of fair-chase sportsmanship and maintaining records of native North American big game species.

Wallace becomes the Club's 29th president, following the tenure of Lowell E. Baier.

Wallace has served as a club officer and as a member of various committees. He also is active in Pope and Young Club, Lone Star Bow Hunter's Association, American Hunting Club, International Game and Fish Association, Texas Wildlife Association, National Rifle Association and Ducks Unlimited.

The following is a statement issued by Wallace regarding his vision and direction for Boone and Crockett Club:

"As the 29th president of the nation's first national conservation organization, it is my responsibility to ensure efforts to address the major conservation and hunting heritage challenges the Boone and Crockett Club and our partners have been working on are carried through to completion and to set the course for the future.

These challenges are clearly delineated in "Wildlife for the 21st Century: III," the recommendations submitted to the Obama Administration as a result of the 2008 Whitehouse Conference on North American Wildlife Policy.

One of my greatest concerns is that loopholes exist in certain federal laws and regulations intended for the greater good of wildlife and wild places, and that these loopholes are actually blocking sound, science based management on public and private lands. Another concern is that provisions in these laws are allowing taxpayer's moneys intended for wildlife management and conservation programs to be spent elsewhere.

I also see the need for more like-minded groups to come together to address today's challenges. Those who generate money for conservation and wildlife management need to be more closely linked with those who spend those monies on the ground. Hunting and shooting industry manufacturers whose products generate excise tax revenues should have a clear line of communication with federal and state wildlife agencies, conservation organizations and other wildlife professionals who understand the science and how best to spend these monies to benefit wildlife and their habitats.

To this end, I am excited to be attending the 2011 SHOT show and meeting with industry leaders to learn how the Club can help facilitate these connections.

Finally, the hunter-conservationist community has potential allies in agriculture, forestry, energy development and fisheries who are facing many of the same struggles that we do on a day-to-day basis. I would like to see these groups come together. The way I see it, we will benefit from strength in numbers in terms of collectively addressing current and future challenges."


About the Boone and Crockett Club
Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, the Boone and Crockett Club promotes guardianship and visionary management of big game and associated wildlife in North America. The Club maintains the highest standards of fair-chase sportsmanship and habitat stewardship. Member accomplishments include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostering the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the cornerstones of modern game laws. The Boone and Crockett Club is headquartered in Missoula, Mont. For details, visit www.boone-crockett.org.

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Club's 27th Big Game Awards Book Now Available
January 11, 2011
By Boone and Crockett Club
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MISSOULA, Mont.--It's a piece of hunting history; a catalog of conservation successes. The newly published Boone and Crockett Club's 27th Big Game Awards, 2007-2009 is part of a book series that spans over half a century, and it's now available for purchase.

The 704-page paperback contains listings for over 4,900 trophies in 32 categories of North American big game taken between 2007 and 2009. Listings include B&C gross score, final score, location and date of kill, hunter and owner, overall rank and more.

The book also includes over 60 color and hundreds of B&W field photos and portraits.

"What really sets this publication apart are the written accounts of the hunts for some of the top trophies taken in the 27th Awards period. Readers will learn not just statistics, but the actual stories behind some of the greatest game animals ever taken," said Julie Houk, director of publications for Boone and Crockett Club.

Boone and Crockett Club's 27th Big Game Awards, 2007-2009, retails for $29.95 (Boone and Crockett members receive a discount) and is available in stores or directly from the Club. Order at www.boone-crockett.org or by calling 888-840-4868.


About the Boone and Crockett Club
Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, the Boone and Crockett Club promotes guardianship and visionary management of big game and associated wildlife in North America. The Club maintains the highest standards of fair-chase sportsmanship and habitat stewardship. Member accomplishments include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostering the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the cornerstones of modern game laws. The Boone and Crockett Club is headquartered in Missoula, Mont. For details, visit www.boone-crockett.org.




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